Tilia tomentosa ‘Petiolaris’

6 Sep

Tilia tomentosa 'Petiolaris' (15/08/2015, Kew Gardens, London)

Tilia tomentosa ‘Petiolaris’ (15/08/2015, Kew Gardens, London)

Position: Full sun to partial shade

Soil: Moist, well drained

Flowering period: Summer

Eventual Height: 30m

Eventual Spread: 15m

Hardiness: 4b, 5a, 5b, 6a, 6b, 7a, 7b, 8a, 8b, 9a, 9b, 10a

Family: Malvaceae

Tilia tomentosa 'Petiolaris' Leaf (15/08/2015, Kew Gardens, London)

Tilia tomentosa ‘Petiolaris’ Leaf (15/08/2015, Kew Gardens, London)

Tilia tomentosa ‘Petiolaris’ is a fast growing deciduous tree with a broadly columnar, weeping habit. Its mid to dark green leaves are cordate with serrate margins, occasionally lobed, densely white-hairy underneath, are up to 10cm long and 8cm broad. Its branches droop, producing the pendulous effect. Its green/ yellow fragrant flowers  are borne in cymes of up to ten. Its fruit are drupes which are up to 1cm long.

Tilia tomentosa ‘Petiolaris’, commonly known as the Weeping Silver Lime or Silver Pendant Lime. The species Tilia tomentosa is native to southwestern Asia. Tilia tomentosa ‘Petiolaris’ is synonymous with Tilia ‘Petiolaris’.

Tilia tomentosa 'Petiolaris' Flower (28/07/2012, Kew Gardens, London)

Tilia tomentosa ‘Petiolaris’ Flower (28/07/2012, Kew Gardens, London)

The etymological root of the binomial name Tilia is the ancient Latin name for the Lime Tree. Tomentosa is derived from Latin tomentum meaning ‘the hairy stuffing of a pillow’, in reference to the hairy undersides of the leaves. Petiolaris refers to the distinct petioles of this tree.

The landscape architect may find Tilia tomentosa ‘Petiolaris’ useful as an urban park specimen tree. It is also suitable for use as a hedging species. Once established this tree is drought tolerant. It is tolerant of pollution and soil compaction.

Tilia tomentosa 'Petiolaris' Fruit (15/08/2015, Kew Gardens, London)

Tilia tomentosa ‘Petiolaris’ Fruit (15/08/2015, Kew Gardens, London)

Ecologically, Tilia tomentosa ‘Petiolaris’ is pollinated by honeybees, however it is toxic to other bees that cannot digest its nectar, shown by large numbers of comatose bees below the tree while it is in inflorescence.

The Royal Horticultural Society has given Tilia tomentosa ‘Brabant’ their prestigious Award of Garden Merit in 1993. Tilia ‘Brabant’ has a symmetrical conical crown.

Tilia tomentosa ‘Petiolaris’ prefers moist, well-drained soils. It tolerates most pH of soil, although it prefers an alkaline pH.

Tilia tomentosa 'Petiolaris' Bark (28/07/2012, Kew Gardens, London)

Tilia tomentosa ‘Petiolaris’ Bark (28/07/2012, Kew Gardens, London)

Tilia tomentosa ‘Petiolaris’ requires little maintenance. Hedge pruning or the removal of dead or damaged material should be carried out from mid-summer to mid-winter to minimise wound bleed. This plant can also withstand a very hard pruning.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: