Aster ageratoides var. ovatus

11 Nov

Aster ageratoides var. ovatus Flower (20/10/2012, Kew Gardens, London)

Aster ageratoides var. ovatus Flower (20/10/2012, Kew Gardens, London)

Position: Full sun to partial shade

Flowering period: Late summer to autumn

Soil: Moist, well drained

Eventual Height: 60cm

Eventual Spread: 70cm

Hardiness: 5a, 5b, 6a, 6b, 7a, 7b, 8a, 8b

Family: Asteraceae

Aster ageratoides var. ovatus is a free flowering herbaceous perennial. Its dark green leaves are ovate with serrate margins, up to 12cm long and 4cm brad. Its stems are erect, branching upwards. Its white flowers are daisy like with yellow centres, up to 2cm across and appear in loose corymbs. Its roots are rhizomes which aids its spread.

The species Aster ageratoides, commonly known as the Japanese Aster, is native to eastern Asia.

The etymological root of the binomial name Aster is derived from the Greek asthr meaning ‘star’, in reference to its flower. Ageratoides is derived from the Greek meaning ‘like Agreratum’, another genus.Ovatus is derived from the Latin ovare ‘to lay eggs’.

The landscape architect may find Aster ageratoides var. ovatus useful as part of a mixed herbaceous planting scheme.

Aster ageratoides var. ovatus (20/10/2012, Kew Gardens, London)

Aster ageratoides var. ovatus (20/10/2012, Kew Gardens, London)

Ecologically, Aster ageratoides var. ovatus flowers are attractive to pollinating insects.

Aster ageratoides var. ovatus prefers moist, fertile, well-drained soils. It tolerates most pH of soil.

Aster ageratoides var. ovatus requires little maintenance.

Davis Landscape Architecture

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