Celtis occidentalis

5 Oct

Celtis occidentalis Autumn (21/09/2013, Kew Gardens, London)

Celtis occidentalis Autumn (21/09/2013, Kew Gardens, London)

Position: Full sun to partial shade

Flowering period: Early summer

Soil: Moist, well drained

Eventual Height: 20m

Eventual Spread: 20m

Hardiness: 3a, 3b, 4a, 4b, 5a, 5b, 6a, 6b, 7a, 7b, 8a, 8b, 9a

Family: Cannabaceae

Celtis occidentalis is a deciduous tree with a rounded, spreading habit. Its mid green leaves are ovate to ovate-lancelate with serrate margins, are asymmetric at their bases, up to 10cm long and 6cm broad. In autumn its leaves turn pale yellow. Its light brown/ sliver grey bark is scaly. Its green flowers are monoecious, the male appearing on slender drooping pedicels. Its red/ purple fruit are berries and appear in autumn.

Celtis occidentalis Autumn Leaf (21/09/2013, Kew Gardens, London)

Celtis occidentalis Autumn Leaf (21/09/2013, Kew Gardens, London)

Celtis occidentalis, commonly known as the Common Hackberry, Nettle Tree, Northern Hackberry or American Hackberry, is native to north east and central North America.

The etymological root of the binomial name Celtis is from the ancient Greek meaning ‘a tree with sweet fruit’. Occidentalis is from the Latin meaning ‘from the west’.

The landscape architect may find Celtis occidentalis useful as an attractive medium sized tree with attractive autumn colour. As this tree is tolerant of urban pollution it is also suitable as a street tree. Once established this tree is drought tolerant.

Celtis occidentalis Bark (21/09/2013, Kew Gardens, London)

Celtis occidentalis Bark (21/09/2013, Kew Gardens, London)

Ecologically, Celtis occidentalis berries are eaten by some bird and mammal species.

Celtis occidentalis prefers moist, deep, fertile, well-drained soils. It tolerates most pH of soil.

Celtis occidentalis requires little maintenance.

Davis Landscape Architecture

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: