Carpinus cordata

26 Sep

Carpinus cordata (17/08/2014, Kew Gardens, London)

Carpinus cordata (17/08/2014, Kew Gardens, London)

Position: Sun to shade

Soil: Moist, well drained

Flowering period: Late spring

Eventual Height: 15m

Eventual Spread: 15m

Hardiness: 5a, 5b, 6a, 6b, 7a, 7b, 8a, 8b, 9a

Family: Betulaceae

Carpinus cordata Leaf (17/08/2014, Kew Gardens, London)

Carpinus cordata Leaf (17/08/2014, Kew Gardens, London)

Carpinus cordata is a slow growing deciduous tree with a juvenile pyramidal form, this matures to a more rounded habit. Its dark green leaves are ovate with a heart shaped cleft at their bases and serrulate margins, up to 11cm long and 5cm broad. Its monoecious flowers are in the form of yellow/ green catkins and are wind pollinated. Its initially green fruit appear after the female flowers, are encased in three lobed bracts which mature to brown and are up to 8cm long.

Carpinus cordata Fruit (17/08/2014, Kew Gardens, London)

Carpinus cordata Fruit (17/08/2014, Kew Gardens, London)

Carpinus cordata, commonly known as Heartleaf Hornbeam, is native to Japan, north east China, Korea and south east Russia. In its native habitat it grows in forests on moist mountain slopes.

The etymological root of the binomial name Carpinus was the ancient Latin name for this species. Cordata is derived from the Latin meaning ‘heart shaped’.

Carpinus cordata Bark (17/08/2014, Kew Gardens, London)

Carpinus cordata Bark (17/08/2014, Kew Gardens, London)

The landscape architect may find Carpinus cordata useful as a compact tree suitable for shady locations.

Ecologically, Carpinus cordata is of little value to UK wildlife.

Carpinus cordata prefers moist, fertile, humus rich, well-drained soils. It tolerates most pH of soil.

Carpinus betulus requires little maintenance.

Davis Landscape Architecture

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