Tilia kiusiana

3 Nov

Tilia kiusiana (19/09/2015, Kew Gardens, London)

Tilia kiusiana (19/09/2015, Kew Gardens, London)

Position: Full sun to partial shade

Flowering period: Summer

Soil: Moist, well drained

Eventual Height: 10m

Eventual Spread: 8m

Hardiness: 6a, 6b, 7a, 7b, 8a, 8b, 9a

Family: Malvaceae

Tilia kiusiana Leaf (19/09/2015, Kew Gardens, London)

Tilia kiusiana Leaf (19/09/2015, Kew Gardens, London)

Tilia kiusiana is a slow growing deciduous tree with an upright habit. Its light green leaves are ovate with serrulate margins, up to 8cm long and 3cm broad. Its leaves turn yellow in autumn before they fall. Its grey bark becomes flaky with age. Its fragrant pale yellow flowers have a white/ green oblong bract.

Tilia kiusiana Autumn Leaf (28/09/2014, Kew Gardens London)

Tilia kiusiana Autumn Leaf (28/09/2014, Kew Gardens London)

Tilia kiusiana, commonly known as Kyushu Lime, is native to the southern main island of Japan.

The etymological root of the binomial name Tilia is the ancient Latin name for the Lime Tree. Kiusiana is named after the Japanese island Kyushu from where this tree originates.

Tilia kiusiana Fruit (19/09/2015, Kew Gardens, London)

Tilia kiusiana Fruit (19/09/2015, Kew Gardens, London)

The landscape architect may find Tilia kiusiana useful as an attractive small deciduous tree.

Ecologically, Tilia kiusiana flowers are attractive to pollinating insects.

Tilia kiusiana Bark (28/09/2014, Kew Gardens London)

Tilia kiusiana Bark (28/09/2014, Kew Gardens London)

Tilia kiusiana prefers moist, fertile, well-drained soils. It tolerates most pH of soil.

Tilia kiusiana requires little maintenance.

 

Landscape Architecture

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