Phyllostachys bambusoides

22 May

Phyllostachys bambusoides (04/04/2015, Kyoto Botanic Gardens, Kyoto, Japan)

Phyllostachys bambusoides (04/04/2015, Kyoto Botanic Gardens, Kyoto, Japan)

Position: Full sun to partial shade

Flowering period: N/A

Soil: Moist, well drained

Eventual Height: 16m

Eventual Spread: 5m

Hardiness: 7b, 8a, 8b, 9a, 9b, 10a, 10b

Family: Poaceae

Phyllostachys bambusoides is a running, upright evergreen bamboo. Its dark green glossy leaves are linear with entire margins up t0 15cm long and 25mm broad and appear in clumps of up to 6. Its green canes may achieve a diameter of up to 15cm. The plant flowers approximately only every 130 years. This plant spreads by underground rhizomes and may be invasive.

Phyllostachys bambusoides Leaf (04/04/2015, Kyoto Botanic Gardens, Kyoto, Japan)

Phyllostachys bambusoides Leaf (04/04/2015, Kyoto Botanic Gardens, Kyoto, Japan)

Phyllostachys bambusoides, commonly known as Madake, Giant Timber Bamboo or Japanese Timber Bamboo, is native to China and possibly Japan. It is the most commonly grown timber bamboo in Japan.

The etymological root of the binomial name Phyllostachys is derived from the Greek phyllon meaning ‘leaf’ and stachys meaning ‘spike’. Bambusoides is derived from the Latin meaning ‘resembling Bambusa’. Bambusa was a name for bamboo that was the result of an erroneous pronunciation of the Indian word Mambu.

The landscape architect may find Phyllostachys bambusoides useful as a large architectural bamboo with thick green stems. In spring its shoots may grow up to 1m per day.

Ecologically, Phyllostachys bambusoides is of little wildlife value in the UK.

Phyllostachys bambusoides Stem (04/04/2015, Kyoto Botanic Gardens, Kyoto, Japan)

Phyllostachys bambusoides Stem (04/04/2015, Kyoto Botanic Gardens, Kyoto, Japan)

Phyllostachys bambusoides prefers moist, fertile, well-drained soils. It tolerates most pH of soil.

Phyllostachys bambusoides requires root a barrier installed at the time of planting if the unrestricted spread of this plant is not desired. Spent stems may be removed to keep a tidy apearance.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: