Myrica rubra

5 Jun

Myrica rubra Bark Leaf (11/04/2015, Okunoshima Island, Japan)

Myrica rubra Bark Leaf (11/04/2015, Okunoshima Island, Japan)

Position: Full sun to light shade

Flowering period: Spring

Soil: Moist, well drained, neutral to acid

Eventual Height: 15m

Eventual Spread: 15m

Hardiness: 9b, 10a, 10b, 11

Family: Myricaceae

Myrica rubra is an evergreen tree with a domed habit. Its leathery dark green leaves are narrow elliptic with entire margins, up to 14cm long and 4cm broad. Its trunk may achieve a diameter of up to 60cm. Its grey bark is smooth. This tree is dioecious with separate male and female plants. Its red to dark purple fruit are spherical, knobbly, up to 1.5cm across. Its roots will fix nitrogen in soil.

Myrica rubra Bark Leaf (11/04/2015, Okunoshima Island, Japan)

Myrica rubra Bark Leaf (11/04/2015, Okunoshima Island, Japan)

Myrica rubra, commonly known as Chinese Bayberry, Japanese Bayberry, Yumberry, Waxberry, Chinese Strawberry or Yangmei, is native to south China. This tree has naturalised in a number of countries including, Japan, Taiwan, Korea, Philippines and Nepal. In its native habitat it grows in mixed forests on mountain slopes at an altitude between 100m – 1500m.

The etymological root of the binomial name Myrica is derived from the Ancient Greek name for another shrub, probably the tamarisk. Rubra is from the Latin meaning ‘red’.

The landscape architect may find Myrica rubra useful as an attractive parkland tree. It is also suitable for use as  street tree due to its tolerance of poor soils. Care should be taken when locating this tree due to its fruit dropping a causing a mess.

Myrica rubra Bark (11/04/2015, Okunoshima Island, Japan)

Myrica rubra Bark (11/04/2015, Okunoshima Island, Japan)

Ecologically, Myrica rubra fruit are attrative to birds and mammals (including humans).

Myrica rubra prefers moist, fertile, well-drained soils. It prefers an acid to neutral pH of soil. It will tolerate poor soils.

Myrica rubra requires little maintenance.

DAVIS Landscape Architecture

Landscape Architecture

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: