Cordyline indivisa

16 Nov

Cordyline indivisa (08/11/2015, Kew gardens, London)

Cordyline indivisa (08/11/2015, Kew gardens, London)

Position: Full sun to partial shade

Soil: Well drained soil

Flowering period: Summer

Eventual Height: 8m

Eventual Spread: 3m

Hardiness: 7b, 8a, 8b, 9a, 9b, 10a, 10b

Family: Asparagaceae

Cordyline indivisa is an evergreen monocotyledon tree with a tufted habit. Its blue green leaves are lanceolate with entire margins, up to 2m long, 25cm across and emerge from the growing tips of the branched trunk in dense rosettes. Its trunk may achieve a diameter of up to 80cm. Its green/ white flowers appear as pendulous panicles which are up to 30cm long. Its dark blue fruit are globose and up to 6mm across.

Cordyline indivisa Leaf (08/11/2015, Kew gardens, London)

Cordyline indivisa Leaf (08/11/2015, Kew gardens, London)

Cordyline indivisa  commonly known as the Mountain Cabbage Tree or Bush Flax, is native to New Zealand. In it native habitat it grows in wet sub alpine scrubland.

The etymological root of the binomial name Cordyline is derived from the Greek kordyle  meaning ‘club’. Indivisa is derived from the Latin indivisus meaning ‘undivided’.

The landscape architect may find Cordyline indivisa useful as an attractive, unusual tree. It should be noted this plant may suddenly collapse during periods of high temperatures or water stress.

Cordyline indivisa Trunk (08/11/2015, Kew gardens, London)

Cordyline indivisa Trunk (08/11/2015, Kew gardens, London)

Ecologically, Cordyline indivisa flowers are attractive to pollinating insects.

Cordyline indivisa prefers moist, fertile, well-drained soils. It tolerates most pH of soil.

Cordyline indivisa requires little maintenance.

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Landscape Architecture

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2 Responses to “Cordyline indivisa”

  1. It looks like some palm. Does it survive at temperatures like -20C here (-4F)?

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