Aesculus pavia

8 Jun

Aesculus pavia (22/05/2016, Kew Gardens, London)

Aesculus pavia (22/05/2016, Kew Gardens, London)

Position: Full sun to partial shade

Flowering period: Spring

Soil: Moist, well drained

Eventual Height: 8m

Eventual Spread: 8m

Hardiness: 4b, 5a, 5b, 6a, 6b, 7a, 7b, 8a, 8b, 9a

Family: Sapindaceae

Aesculus pavia Flower (22/05/2016, Kew Gardens, London)

Aesculus pavia Flower (22/05/2016, Kew Gardens, London)

Aesculus pavia is a small deciduous tree or a large shrub with a rounded habit and often multi stemmed. Its dark green leaves are palmately compound with five leaflets, up to 16cm long and 15cm across. Its leaflets are elliptic with serrulate margins, up to 15cm long and 5cm broad. Its grey/ light brown bark is smooth and flaky. Its hermaphroditic red flowers are tubular, up to 3cm long and are produced in erect panicles which are up to 25cm long. Its fruit is a light brown round smooth capsule, are up to 4cm across and contain up to 3 large seed.

Aesculus pavia Leaf (22/05/2016, Kew Gardens, London)

Aesculus pavia Leaf (22/05/2016, Kew Gardens, London)

Aesculus pavia, commonly known as Red Buckeye or Firecracker Plant, is native to south and east USA. In its native habitat it grow at forest margins and clearings.

The etymological root of the binomial name Aesculus is from the ancient Latin name for the Horse Chestnut (Aesculus hippocastanum). Pavia is named after Peter Paaw (1564 – 1617), a Dutch botanist.

Aesculus pavia Bark (22/05/2016, Kew Gardens, London)

Aesculus pavia Bark (22/05/2016, Kew Gardens, London)

The landscape architect may find Aesculus pavia useful as a small flowering specimen tree. It should be noted the seeds of this tree may be potentially toxic if ingested.

Ecologically, Aesculus pavia flowers are attractive to pollinating insects, including bees.

Aesculus pavia prefers moist, well-drained calcareous soils. It tolerates most pH of soil.

Aesculus pavia requires little maintenance. Dead or diseased material may be removed in early spring.

DAVIS Landscape Architecture

Landscape Architecture

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