Search results for 'Asteraceae'

Olearia nummularifolia

5 Jan

Olearia nummularifolia (07/12/2015, Kew Gardens, London)

Olearia nummularifolia (07/12/2015, Kew Gardens, London)

Position: Full sun

Flowering period: Summer

Soil: Moist, well drained

Eventual Height: 2m

Eventual Spread: 2m

Hardiness: 8b 9a 9b, 10a, 10b

Family: Asteraceae

Olearia nummularifolia is a slow growing evergreen shrub with a rounded habit. Its dark green fleshy leaves are obovate with entire rolled margins, are up to 1cm long and 5mm across. Its fragrant white flowers are daisy like with cream centres, up to 5mm across and appear terminally in clusters of up to 3.

Olearia nummularifolia Leaf (07/12/2015, Kew Gardens, London)

Olearia nummularifolia Leaf (07/12/2015, Kew Gardens, London)

Olearia nummularifolia, commonly known as Daisy Bush, is from New Zealand. In its native habitat it grows in alpine regions in areas of low scrub.

The etymological root of the binomial name Olearia named for Johann Gottfried Olearius (1635-1711), a German theologian and botanist. Nummularifolia is derived from the Latin nummularia meaning ‘coins’ and folium meaning ‘leaf’.

Olearia nummularifolia Seed Heads (07/12/2015, Kew Gardens, London)

Olearia nummularifolia Seed Heads (07/12/2015, Kew Gardens, London)

The landscape architect may find Olearia nummularifolia useful as an evergreen flowering shrub suitable for coastal regions as it is tolerant of maritime conditions.

Ecologically, Olearia nummularifolia flowers are attractive to pollinating insects.

Olearia nummularifolia prefers moist, fertile, well-drained soils. It tolerates most pH of soil. This shrub dislikes wet soils.

Olearia nummularifolia requires little maintenance.

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Landscape Architecture

Argyranthemum frutescens subsp. canariae

10 Nov

Argyranthemum frutescens subsp. canariae (08/11/2015, Kew Gardens, London)

Argyranthemum frutescens subsp. canariae (08/11/2015, Kew Gardens, London)

Position: Full sun

Flowering period: Spring to summer

Soil: Moist, well drained

Eventual Height: 60 cm

Eventual Spread: 60cm

Hardiness: 9b, 10a, 10b, 11

Family: Asteraceae

Argyranthemum frutescens subsp. canariae is an evergreen herbaceous perennial with a bushy habit (although it is usually grown as an annual in the UK). Its green/ grey leaves are obovate in outline, deeply 2 or 3 pinnately lobed and up to 10cm long. Its leaves are aromatic when bruised. Its white flowers are daisy like with yellow centres and up to 7.5cm across. Its fruit is an achene and up to 6mm long.

Argyranthemum frutescens subsp. canariae Flower (08/11/2015, Kew Gardens, London)

Argyranthemum frutescens subsp. canariae Flower (08/11/2015, Kew Gardens, London)

Argyranthemum frutescens subsp. canariae, commonly known as Paris daisy, Marguerite or Marguerite Daisy, is native to the Canary Islands. In its native habitat it grows on dry cliffs.  Argyranthemum frutescens subsp. canariae is synonymous with Chrysanthemum  frutescens.

The etymological root of the binomial name Argyranthemum is derived from the Greek argyros meaning ‘silver’ and anthemom meaning ‘plant flower’. Frutescens is derived from the Latin frutex meaning ‘shrub’ or ‘bush’ and the epithet -escens meaning ‘-ish’.

Argyranthemum frutescens subsp. canariae Leaf (08/11/2015, Kew Gardens, London)

Argyranthemum frutescens subsp. canariae Leaf (08/11/2015, Kew Gardens, London)

The landscape architect may find Argyranthemum frutescens subsp. canariae useful as an evergreen herbaceous perennial (or annual) with a long flowering period. Once established this perennial is drought tolerant. This plant prefers a sheltered position.

Ecologically, Argyranthemum frutescens subsp. canariae flowers are attractive to pollinating insects, including butterflies.

The Royal Horticultural Society has given the variety Argyranthemum frutescens subsp. canariae their prestigious Award of Garden Merit in 1993.

Argyranthemum frutescens subsp. canariae prefers moist, humus rich, well-drained soils. It tolerates most pH of soil. It dislikes wet soils.

Argyranthemum frutescens subsp. canariae requires little maintenance. The removal of dead flowers will prolong the flowering season.

DAVIS Landscape Architecture

Landscape Architecture

Brachyglottis ‘Sunshine’

15 Jul

Brachyglottis 'Sunshine' (03/07/2015, Walworth, London)

Brachyglottis ‘Sunshine’ (03/07/2015, Walworth, London)

Position: Full sun to partial shade

Flowering period: Summer

Soil: Moist, well drained

Eventual Height: 1.5m

Eventual Spread: 1.5m

Hardiness: 8a, 8b, 9a, 9b, 10a, 10b

Family: Asteraceae

Brachyglottis ‘Sunshine’ is an evergreen shrub with a spreading habit. Its grey hairy leaves are ovate with entire margins, up to 8cm long and 4cm broad. Its yellow flowers are up to 25mm across.

Brachyglottis 'Sunshine' Flower (03/07/2015, Walworth, London)

Brachyglottis ‘Sunshine’ Flower (03/07/2015, Walworth, London)

Brachyglottis ‘Sunshine’, commonly known as Senecio, is a member of the Dunedin Hybrids and is a hybrid between   Brachyglottis  laxifoliaBrachyglottis greyi and Brachyglottis compacta. Brachyglottis ‘Sunshine’ is synonymous with Senecio ‘Sunshine’.

The etymological root of the binomial name Brachyglottis is derived from the Greek braxus meaning ‘short’ and glwssa meaning ‘tongue’.

The landscape architect may find Brachyglottis ‘Sunshine’ useful as a robust evergreen groundcover shrub with attractive flowers. It may be used as an informal hedge. Once established this shrub is drought tolerant. This plant is tolerant of maritime conditions.

Brachyglottis 'Sunshine' Leaf (03/07/2015, Walworth, London)

Brachyglottis ‘Sunshine’ Leaf (03/07/2015, Walworth, London)

Ecologically, Brachyglottis ‘Sunshine’ flowers are attractive to polinating insects.

The Royal Horticultural Society has given Brachyglottis ‘Sunshine’ their prestigious Award of Garden Merit in 1993.

Brachyglottis ‘Sunshine’ prefers moist, fertile, well-drained soils. It tolerates most pH of soil.

Brachyglottis ‘Sunshine’ requires little maintenance. Regular pruning will ensure the plant remains bushy and hides it s lower stems.

DAVIS Landscape Architecture

Landscape Architecture

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