Search results for 'Oleaceae'

Syringa oblata

31 May

Syringa oblata (23/04/2015, Kew Gardens, London)

Syringa oblata (23/04/2015, Kew Gardens, London)

Position: Full sun to partial shade

Soil: Moist, well drained

Flowering period: Spring

Eventual Height: 5m

Eventual Spread: 5m

Hardiness: 3a, 3b, 4a, 4b, 5a, 5b, 6a, 6b, 7a, 7b, 8a

Family: Oleaceae

Syringa oblata a deciduous shrub with a spreading habit. Its dark green leaves are ovate entire margins, up to 10cm long and 8cm broad. Its pale lilac fragrant flowers are arranged as conical terminal panicles, are up to 10cm long and 8cm across. Its brown fruit is a dry capsule which is up to 15mm long. Its roots may produce suckers.

Syringa oblata Flower (23/04/2015, Kew Gardens, London)

Syringa oblata Flower (23/04/2015, Kew Gardens, London)

Syringa oblata,  commonly known as Broadleaf Lilac and Early Blooming Lilac, is native to China and Korea. In its native habitat it grows in thickets and woodland margins.

Syringa is derived from the Greek syrinx meaning ‘a tube’, possibly alluding to its hollow stems. Oblata is derived from the Latin oblatus menaing ‘somewhat flattened at the ends’.

The landscape architect may find Syringa oblata useful as a free flowering shrub with an attractive scent. It is a suitable shrub for using to create a deciduous hedge.

Ecologically, Syringa oblata flowers are attractive to pollinating insects including bees.

Syringa oblata Leaf (23/04/2015, Kew Gardens, London)

Syringa oblata Leaf (23/04/2015, Kew Gardens, London)

Syringa oblata prefers moist, humus rich, well-drained soils. It tolerates most pH of soil, although it prefers slightly acidic soil.

Syringa oblata requires little maintenance. Flowers may be removed after they have faded and before they set seed to increase flowering the following year. Any necessary pruning should be carried out after flowering. Syringa oblata flower on old wood and will produce more flowers if left unpruned. Over mature specimens may be rejuvenated by pruning the plant hard to encourage vigorous new growth.

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Fraxinus lanuginosa

23 Oct

Fraxinus lanuginosa (19/09/2015, Kew gardens, London)

Fraxinus lanuginosa (19/09/2015, Kew gardens, London)

Position: Full sun

Flowering period:Late spring

Soil: Moist, well drained

Eventual Height: 15m

Eventual Spread: 10m

Hardiness: 5b, 6a, 6b, 7a, 7b, 8a, 8b

Family: Oleaceae

Fraxinus lanuginosa is a deciduous tree with a round habit. Its mid green leaves are opposite, odd pinnate, up to 15cm long with up to 7 leaflets. Its leaflets are ovoid with serrulate margins, up to 7cm long and 4cm broad. Its leaves turn yellow to purple in autumn before they fall. Its trunk may achieve a diameter of up to 50cm. Its bark is dark grey and smooth. Its cream/ white flowers are produced in panicles, each flower is composed of four petals and are up to 7mm long. Its fruit is a sumara which is up to 4cm long and 5mm broad, it is initially reddish ripening to brown.

Fraxinus lanuginosa Leaf (19/09/2015, Kew gardens, London)

Fraxinus lanuginosa Leaf (19/09/2015, Kew gardens, London)

Fraxinus lanuginosa, commonly known as Japanese Ash or Tamo, is native to Japan and the south east corner of Russia.

The etymological root of the binomial name Fraxinus is from the ancient Latin name for this tree.
Lanuginosa is derived from the Latin lanugo meaning ‘downy’.

The landscape architect may find  Fraxinus lanuginosa useful as an attractive parkland or street tree with attractive flowers and autumn leaf colour. This tree is tolerant of urban pollution.

Fraxinus lanuginosa Autumn Leaf (19/09/2015, Kew gardens, London)

Fraxinus lanuginosa Autumn Leaf (19/09/2015, Kew gardens, London)

Ecologically,  Fraxinus lanuginosa flowers are attractive to pollinating insects. Its fruit are attractive to some birds and mammals.

Fraxinus lanuginosa prefers moist, fertile, well-drained soils. It tolerates most pH of soil.

Fraxinus lanuginosa requires little maintenance. Necessary pruning should be carried out in late winter.

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Fraxinus excelsior ‘Pendula’

2 Sep

Fraxinus excelsior 'Pendula' (15/08/2015, Kew Gardens, London)

Fraxinus excelsior ‘Pendula’ (15/08/2015, Kew Gardens, London)

Position: Full sun

Flowering period: Spring

Soil: Moist, well drained

Eventual Height: 15m

Eventual Spread: 15m

Hardiness: 4b, 5a, 5b, 6a, 6b, 7a, 7b, 8a, 8b, 9a, 9b

Family: Oleaceae

Fraxinus excelsior 'Pendula' Leaf (15/08/2015, Kew Gardens, London)

Fraxinus excelsior ‘Pendula’ Leaf (15/08/2015, Kew Gardens, London)

Fraxinus excelsior ‘Pendula’ is a deciduous tree with a weeping/ spreading habit. Its mid green leaves are up to 35cm long, pinnate, compound, with up to 13 leaflets. Its leaflets are lanceolate with serrate margins, up to 12cm long and 3cm broad Its distinctive buds are black. Its trunk may achieve a diameter of up to 2m. Its bark is smooth on young trees becoming vertically fissured with age. Its dark purple hermaphrodite flowers do not have petals, appear in clusters and appear before the leaves. Its fruit is a sumara and up to 4.5cm long.

The species, Fraxinus excelsior is commonly known as Ash, European Ash or Common Ash, is native to most of Europe (including the UK, excluding the extreme north and south west), northern Turkey and the Caucasus. Fraxinus excelsior ‘Pendula’ is commonly known as Weeping Ash.  Ash die-back has affected a large number of threes in eastern and northern Europe, this is caused by the fungus Chalara fraxinea.

Fraxinus excelsior 'Pendula' Fruit (15/08/2015, Kew Gardens, London)

Fraxinus excelsior ‘Pendula’ Fruit (15/08/2015, Kew Gardens, London)

The etymological root of the binomial name Fraxinus is from the ancient Latin name for this tree. Excelsior is from the Latin meaning ‘ever upward’. Pendula is derived from the Latin pendeo meaning ‘to hang’.

The landscape architect may find Fraxinus excelsior ‘Pendula’ may be used as an unusual parkland specimen tree. This tree is tolerant of urban pollution.

Fraxinus excelsior 'Pendula' Bark (15/08/2015, Kew Gardens, London)

Fraxinus excelsior ‘Pendula’ Bark (15/08/2015, Kew Gardens, London)

Ecologically,  Fraxinus excelsior ‘Pendula’ is attractive to birds and mammals for its seed.

Fraxinus excelsior ‘Pendula’ prefers moist, deep, fertile, well-drained soils. It tolerates most pH of soil. It is usually found on calcareous substrates.

Fraxinus excelsior ‘Pendula’ requires little maintenance.

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