Search results for 'betulaceae'

Betula davurica

1 Jun

Betula davurica (23/04/2016, Kew Gardens, London)

Betula davurica (23/04/2016, Kew Gardens, London)

Position: Full sun to partial shade

Flowering period: Spring

Soil: Moist, well drained

Eventual Height: 17m

Eventual Spread: 10m

Hardiness: 4b, 5a, 5b, 6a, 6b, 7a, 7b

Family: Betulaceae

Betula davurica is a deciduous tree with a rounded, spreading habit. Its mid green leaves are ovate to elliptic with double serrate margins, up to 10cm long and 6cm broad. Its leaves turn yellow before they fall in autumn. Its grey/ brown bark is fissured and when mature will exfoliate in paper like curls. Its monoecious flowers are in the form of catkins, are wind pollinated, up to 7cm long and appear before its leaves. Its fruit is a cylindrical aggregate, these disintegrate upon maturity.

Betula davurica Leaf (23/04/2016, Kew Gardens, London)

Betula davurica Leaf (23/04/2016, Kew Gardens, London)

Betula davurica, commonly known as Asian Black Birch or Dahurian Birch, is native to northeast China, Korea and Japan. In its native habitat it grows in forests and mountain slopes.

The etymological root of the binomial name Betula is the old Latin name for the Birch tree. Davurica is named after Dahuria, a region to the north east of Mongolia.

Betula davurica Bark (23/04/2016, Kew Gardens, London)

Betula davurica Bark (23/04/2016, Kew Gardens, London)

The landscape architect may find Betula davurica useful as an attractive tree with open habit, attractive bark and autumn leaf colour. This tree is suitable for wet soils.

Ecologically, Betula davurica leaves provide a valuable source of food for moths and butterflies.

Betula davurica prefers moist, well-drained soils. It tolerates most soils, although it prefers an acid pH. It dislikes dry soils.

Betula davurica requires little maintenance.

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Corylus heterophylla var. heterophylla

20 Oct

Corylus heterophylla var. heterophylla (19/09/2015, Kew Gardens, London)

Corylus heterophylla var. heterophylla (19/09/2015, Kew Gardens, London)

Position: Full sun to partial shade

Flowering period: Mid to late spring

Soil: Moist, well drained

Eventual Height: 7m

Eventual Spread: 7m

Hardiness: 4a, 4b, 5a, 5b, 6a, 6b, 7a, 7b, 8b

Family: Betulaceae

Corylus heterophylla var. heterophylla Flower (19/09/2015, Kew Gardens, London)

Corylus heterophylla var. heterophylla Flower (19/09/2015, Kew Gardens, London)

Corylus heterophylla var. heterophylla is a vigorous, deciduous large shrub or small multiple stemmed tree. Its mid green leaves are alternate, ovate to elliptic with an irregularly or double serrate margin, finely hairy on its lower surface along its veins and glabrous on its upper surface, up to 13cm long and 10cm broad. The leaves turn yellow in autumn before they fall. Its branches are pubescent with white lenticels. Its bark is grey and deeply fissured, forming irregular plates. Its flowers are monoecious with the male inflorescence in the form of pale yellow catkins held in pendulous clusters of up to 5. The female inflorescence is in the form of red catkins held in clusters of up to 6. Its fruit is an ovoid to globose nut up to 1.5cm in diameter.

Corylus heterophylla var. heterophylla Nut (19/09/2015, Kew Gardens, London)

Corylus heterophylla var. heterophylla Nut (19/09/2015, Kew Gardens, London)

Corylus heterophylla var. heterophylla, commonly known as Asian hazel or Siberian Hazel, is native to eastern Asia, including China, Japan, Korea and Russia. In its native habitat it grows in forest margins and mountain slopes in thickets. Corylus heterophylla var. heterophylla is synonymous with Corylus avellana var. davurica.

The etymological root of the binomial name Corylus is from the Latin name for Corylys avellana. Heterophylla is derived from the Greek eteros meaning ‘differing’ and phyllus meaning ‘leaf’.

Corylus heterophylla var. heterophylla Leaf (19/09/2015, Kew Gardens, London)

Corylus heterophylla var. heterophylla Leaf (19/09/2015, Kew Gardens, London)

The landscape architect may find Corylus heterophylla var. heterophylla useful as a large shrub or small tree with edible fruit for use in a community garden.

Ecologically, Corylus heterophylla var. heterophylla fruit is eaten by some species of birds and mammals, including humans.

Corylus heterophylla var. heterophylla Bark (19/09/2015, Kew Gardens, London)

Corylus heterophylla var. heterophylla Bark (19/09/2015, Kew Gardens, London)

Corylus heterophylla var. heterophylla prefers moist, fertile, well-drained soils. It tolerates most pH of soil. It prefers alkaline soils and will not tolerate very acid soils.

Corylus heterophylla var. heterophylla requires little maintenance.

Carpinus turczaninowii

29 Sep

Carpinus turczaninowii (15/08/2015, Kew Gardens, London)

Carpinus turczaninowii (15/08/2015, Kew Gardens, London)

Position: Full sun

Soil: Moist, well drained

Flowering period: Summer

Eventual Height: 15m

Eventual Spread: 10m

Hardiness: 5b, 6a, 6b, 7a, 7b, 8a, 8b, 9a, 9b

Family: Betulaceae

Carpinus turczaninowii is a deciduous tree with a columnar to rounded habit. Its mid-green leaves are ovate with serrulate margins. The foliage becomes a deep red colour in the autumn before they fall. Its grey/ brown bark is shallowly fissured. The tree is monoecious, with the inflorescence in the form of catkins, which are yellow fringed with red. In the female these will be followed by racemes of green fruit with prominent bracts which will mature to a mid brown.

Carpinus turczaninowii Leaf (15/08/2015, Kew Gardens, London)

Carpinus turczaninowii Leaf (15/08/2015, Kew Gardens, London)

Carpinus turczaninowii, commonly known as Korean Hornbeam, Rock Hornbeam or Turczaninow Hornbeam, is native to eastern Asia including China, Japan and Korea. In its native habitat it grows in mixed forests and on mountain slopes.

The etymological root of the binomial name Carpinus was the ancient Latin name for Carpinus betulus. Turczaninowii is after Nikolai Turczaninow (1796 – 1863), a Russian botanist.

The landscape architect may find Carpinus turczaninowii useful as a compact upright specimen tree which has interesting leaf colour in autumnt.

Carpinus turczaninowii Bark (15/08/2015, Kew Gardens, London)

Carpinus turczaninowii Bark (15/08/2015, Kew Gardens, London)

Ecologically,  Carpinus turczaninowii will attract some species of Lepidoptera, whose larvae will feed on its leaves.

Carpinus turczaninowii prefers moist, fertile, well-drained soils. It tolerates most pH of soil.

Carpinus turczaninowii requires little maintenance.

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