Search results for 'liliaceae'

Lilium regale

15 Jul

Lilium regale (02/07/2016, Kew Gardens, London)

Lilium regale (02/07/2016, Kew Gardens, London)

Position: Full sun

Flowering period: Summer

Soil: Moist, well drained

Eventual Height: 1.2m

Eventual Spread: 35cm

Hardiness: 4b, 5a, 5b, 6a, 6b, 7a, 7b, 8a, 8b, 9a

Family: Liliaceae

Lilium regale is a deciduous bulbous perennial with an erect habit. Its mid green leaves are lanceolate with entire margins, up to 8cm long and 3mm across. Its fragrant white flowers are trumpet shaped, yellow at their centres with pink/ purple on their outsides, up to 14cm long and appear as terminal racemes. The roots of this plant appear from a bulb which can achieve a size of up to 35mm across.

Lilium regale Flower (02/07/2016, Kew Gardens, London)

Lilium regale Flower (02/07/2016, Kew Gardens, London)

Lilium regale, commonly known as King’s Lily or Regal Lily, is native to south west China. In its native habitat it grows on rocky slopes and river banks. It should be noted this plant is toxic to cats.

The etymological root of the binomial name Lilium is derived from the Greek leirion the name given to the Madonna Lily (Lilium candidum). Regale is from the Latin regalis meaning ‘regal’.

The landscape architect may find Lilium regale useful as a fragrant bulbous perennial for introducing into a mixed herbaceous perennial.

Lilium regale Leaf (02/07/2016, Kew Gardens, London)

Lilium regale Leaf (02/07/2016, Kew Gardens, London)

Ecologically,  Lilium regale flowers are attractive to pollinating insects.

The Royal Horticultural Society have given Lilium regale their prestigious Award of Garden Merit in 1993.

Lilium regale prefers moist, humus rich, well-drained soils. It tolerates most pH of soil, although it prefers an neutral to acid pH.

Lilium regale requires little maintenance. The scarlet Lily Beetle may attack this plant. The stems of this plant may require staking to support its relatively large blooms.

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Fritillaria meleagris

6 May

Fritillaria meleagris (23/04/2016, Kew Gardens, London)

Fritillaria meleagris (23/04/2016, Kew Gardens, London)

Position: Full sun to partial shade

Flowering period: Late spring

Soil: Moist, well drained

Eventual Height: 30m

Eventual Spread: 5cm

Hardiness: 4b, 5a, 5b, 6a, 6b, 7a, 7b, 8a, 8b, 9a

Family: Liliaceae

Fritillaria meleagris is a deciduous bulbous perennial with an upright. Its grey/ green leaves are lanceolate with entire margins, up to 10cm long and 3mm across. Its purple chequered flowers are bell shaped, up to 3cm across and appear terminally in pairs or singularly. Its roots emerge form a button shaped bulb which is up to 2cm across.

Fritillaria meleagris Flower (23/04/2016, Kew Gardens, London)

Fritillaria meleagris Flower (23/04/2016, Kew Gardens, London)

Fritillaria meleagris, commonly known as Snakes Head Fritillary, Fritillary, Chequer Lily or Chess Flower, is native to Europe to west Siberia. In its native habitat it grows in grassland in damp soils.

The etymological root of the binomial name Fritillaria is derived from the Latin fritillus ’a dice box’ which refers to the markings on the flower of the Snake’s Head Fritillary. Meleagris is named after Meleager of Calydon, a mythological Greek figure.

The landscape architect may find Fritillaria meleagris useful as an attractive spring flowering bulb suitable for naturalising in grass.

Ecologically, Fritillaria meleagris flowers are attractive to pollinating insects.

Fritillaria meleagris Leaf (23/04/2016, Kew Gardens, London)

Fritillaria meleagris Leaf (23/04/2016, Kew Gardens, London)

The Royal Horticultural Society has given the variety Fritillaria meleagris their prestigious Award of Garden Merit in 2012.

Fritillaria meleagris prefers moist, fertile, well-drained soils. It tolerates most pH of soil. This bulb will not tolerate poorly drained soils.

Fritillaria meleagris requires little maintenance.

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Landscape Architecture

Tricyrtis latifolia

24 Sep

Tricyrtis latifolia (15/08/15, Kew Gardens, London)

Tricyrtis latifolia (15/08/15, Kew Gardens, London)

Position: Full sun to partial shade

Flowering period: Summer

Soil: Moist, well drained

Eventual Height: 60cm

Eventual Spread: 30cm

Hardiness: 5a, 5b, 6a, 6b, 7a, 7b, 8a, 8b, 9a

Family: Liliaceae

Tricyrtis latifolia is a deciduous herbaceous perennial with a clump forming habit. Its mid to dark green leaves are obovate to ovate-elliptic with undulate margins and has parallel veins. Its stems are arching and unbranched. Its hermaphroditic, yellow with red/ brown spotted flowers are up to 30mm across, and appear in the upper leaf axils. Its roots are rhizomatous which aids its spread.

Tricyrtis latifolia Flower (15/08/15, Kew Gardens, London)

Tricyrtis latifolia Flower (15/08/15, Kew Gardens, London)

Tricyrtis latifolia, commonly known as the Toad Lily or Tamagawa Hototogisu, is native to eastern Asia, including Japan, some sources reference this species as also being native to China and reader input would be welcomed. In its native habitat it grows in moist woodlands, shaded cliffs and stream banks. Tricyrtis latifolia is synonymous with Tricyrtis bakeri.

The name Trictyris is derived from the Greek tries meaning ‘three’ and kyrtos meaning ‘convex’, referring  to the three out sepals having swollen bases. Latifolia is from the Latin latus meaning ‘broad’ and folium meaning ‘leaf’.

The landscape architect may find Tricyrtis latifolia useful as part of a woodland planting scheme.

Tricyrtis latifolia Leaf (15/08/15, Kew Gardens, London)

Tricyrtis latifolia Leaf (15/08/15, Kew Gardens, London)

Ecologically,  Tricyrtis latifolia flowers are attractive to pollinating insects.

Tricyrtis latifolia prefers moist, humus rich, well-drained soils. It tolerates most pH of soil. It will not tolerate alkali soils.

Tricyrtis latifolia requires little maintenance. Large clumps may be divided in spring.

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Landscape Architecture

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