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Geranium ‘Orion’

25 Jul

Geranium 'Orion' (02/07/2016, Kew Gardens, London)

Geranium ‘Orion’ (02/07/2016, Kew Gardens, London)

Position: Full sun to partial shade

Soil: Moist, well drained soil

Flowering period: Summer

Eventual Height: 80cm

Eventual Spread: 80cm

Hardiness: 5a, 5b, 6a, 6b, 7a, 7b, 8a, 8b, 9a

Family: Geraniaceae

Geranium ‘Orion’ is a deciduous herbaceous perennial with a clump forming habit. Its mid green leaves  are deeply lobed with up to seven divisions, up to 12cm across and 12cm long. Its leaves turn red during autumn before dying. Its dark blue flowers have small white centres, are saucer-shaped borne singly and up to 5cm across.

Geranium 'Orion' Flower (02/07/2016, Kew Gardens, London)

Geranium ‘Orion’ Flower (02/07/2016, Kew Gardens, London)

Geranium ‘Orion’,  commonly known as Geranium Orion,  is a seedling of Geranium ‘Brookside’.

The etymological root of the binomial name Geranium is derived from the Greek geranos, meaning ‘crane’; referring to the beak-like fruit.

The landscape architect may find Geranium ‘Orion’ useful as a free flowering low maintenance ground cover suitable for full sun to partial shade.

Geranium 'Orion' Leaf (02/07/2016, Kew Gardens, London)

Geranium ‘Orion’ Leaf (02/07/2016, Kew Gardens, London)

Ecologically,  Geranium ‘Orion’ flowers are attractive to pollinating insects.

The Royal Horticultural Society gave Geranium ‘Orion’ their prestigious Award of Garden Merit in 2004.

Geranium ‘Orion’ prefers moist, fertile, well-drained soils. It tolerates most pH of soil.

Geranium ‘Orion’ requires little to no maintenance. Flowered stems and old foliage may be removed mid summer to encourage new growth. Large clumps may be divided in spring.

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Landscape Architecture

Salvia nemorosa ‘Caradonna’

11 Jul

Salvia nemorosa 'Caradonna' (02/07/2016, Kew Gardens, London)

Salvia nemorosa ‘Caradonna’ (02/07/2016, Kew Gardens, London)

Position: Full sun to partial shade shade

Soil: Moist, well drained

Flowering period: Summer to autumn

Eventual Height: 70cm

Eventual Spread: 50cm

Hardiness: 5a, 5b, 6a, 6b, 7a, 7b, 8a, 8b, 9a, 9b

Family: Lamiaceae

Salvia nemorosa ‘Caradonna’ is a semi evergreen herbaceous perennial with a clump forming habit. Its dark green aromatic leaves are narrowly ovate with sinuate margins, rough in texture, up to 8cm ling and 3cm across. Its violet-purple flowers appear as branching racemes.

Salvia nemorosa 'Caradonna' Flower (02/07/2016, Kew Gardens, London)

Salvia nemorosa ‘Caradonna’ Flower (02/07/2016, Kew Gardens, London)

The species, Salvia nemorosa, commonly known as Woodland Sage or Balkan Clary, is native to much of central Europe and west Asia.

The etymological root of the binomial name Salvia is derived from the Latin salvare, meaning to ‘save’ or ‘heal’, in reference to its historical use as a medicinal plant. Nemorosa is derived from the Latin nemus meaning ‘forest’, in reference to its woodland origins.

The Landscape architect may find Salvia nemorosa ‘Caradonna’ useful in herbaceous planting schemes, prairie style planting schemes and wildlife gardens. Once established this plant is drought tollerant and suitable for use in xeriscaping. This plant is is deer resistant.

Ecologically, Salvia nemorosa ‘Caradonna’ flowers will attract pollinating insects, including butterflies and bees.

Salvia nemorosa 'Caradonna' Leaf (02/07/2016, Kew Gardens, London)

Salvia nemorosa ‘Caradonna’ Leaf (02/07/2016, Kew Gardens, London)

The Royal Horticultural Society has given Salvia nemorosa ‘Caradonna’ their prestigious Award of Garden Merit in 2012.

Salvia nemorosa ‘Caradonna’ prefers moist, humus rich, well-drained soils. It tolerates most pH of soil.

Salvia nemorosa ‘Caradonna’ requires little maintenance. The flower spikes may be removed as soon as they start to fade to prolong its flowering period.

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Landscape Architecture

Aesculus pavia

8 Jun

Aesculus pavia (22/05/2016, Kew Gardens, London)

Aesculus pavia (22/05/2016, Kew Gardens, London)

Position: Full sun to partial shade

Flowering period: Spring

Soil: Moist, well drained

Eventual Height: 8m

Eventual Spread: 8m

Hardiness: 4b, 5a, 5b, 6a, 6b, 7a, 7b, 8a, 8b, 9a

Family: Sapindaceae

Aesculus pavia Flower (22/05/2016, Kew Gardens, London)

Aesculus pavia Flower (22/05/2016, Kew Gardens, London)

Aesculus pavia is a small deciduous tree or a large shrub with a rounded habit and often multi stemmed. Its dark green leaves are palmately compound with five leaflets, up to 16cm long and 15cm across. Its leaflets are elliptic with serrulate margins, up to 15cm long and 5cm broad. Its grey/ light brown bark is smooth and flaky. Its hermaphroditic red flowers are tubular, up to 3cm long and are produced in erect panicles which are up to 25cm long. Its fruit is a light brown round smooth capsule, are up to 4cm across and contain up to 3 large seed.

Aesculus pavia Leaf (22/05/2016, Kew Gardens, London)

Aesculus pavia Leaf (22/05/2016, Kew Gardens, London)

Aesculus pavia, commonly known as Red Buckeye or Firecracker Plant, is native to south and east USA. In its native habitat it grow at forest margins and clearings.

The etymological root of the binomial name Aesculus is from the ancient Latin name for the Horse Chestnut (Aesculus hippocastanum). Pavia is named after Peter Paaw (1564 – 1617), a Dutch botanist.

Aesculus pavia Bark (22/05/2016, Kew Gardens, London)

Aesculus pavia Bark (22/05/2016, Kew Gardens, London)

The landscape architect may find Aesculus pavia useful as a small flowering specimen tree. It should be noted the seeds of this tree may be potentially toxic if ingested.

Ecologically, Aesculus pavia flowers are attractive to pollinating insects, including bees.

Aesculus pavia prefers moist, well-drained calcareous soils. It tolerates most pH of soil.

Aesculus pavia requires little maintenance. Dead or diseased material may be removed in early spring.

DAVIS Landscape Architecture

Landscape Architecture

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