Phlomis russeliana

26 May

Phlomis russeliana (07/06/2014, Kew Gardens, London)

Phlomis russeliana (07/06/2014, Kew Gardens, London)

Position: Full sun to partial shade

Soil: Moist, well drained

Flowering period: Late spring to early summer

Eventual Height: 90cm

Eventual Spread: 75cm

Hardiness: 4a, 4b, 5a, 5b, 6a, 6b, 7a, 7b, 8a, 8b, 9a, 9b

Family: Lamiaceae

Phlomis russeliana is a herbaceous perennial with an upright habit. It has fleshy mid green leaves which have different shapes depending on their placement; the basal leaves are ovate and heart shaped at the base, however the stem leaves are scalloped and smaller.

Phlomis russeliana Flower (07/06/2014, Kew Gardens, London)

Phlomis russeliana Flower (07/06/2014, Kew Gardens, London)

Phlomis russeliana, is commonly known as Turkish sage and Jerusalem Sage, is native to Turkey and Syria. In its native habitat it grows in deciduous and coniferous woodland clearings and scrub.

The etymological root of the binomial name Phlomis is from the Greek word for mullein (Verbascum), due to the similarity of the leaves. We are unclear as to the root of russeliana and would welcome reader feedback on this issue.

Phlomis russeliana is useful to the Landscape architect as an effective low maintenance medium height ground cover. It drought tolerant and Deers tend not to eat this plant.

Phlomis russeliana is happy at most pH levels and the soil may be chalk, loam or sand. It may be placed in a sheltered or exposed location but will not thrive in a north facing position.

Phlomis russeliana Leaf (07/06/2014, Kew Gardens, London)

Phlomis russeliana Leaf (07/06/2014, Kew Gardens, London)

Ecologically, Phlomis russeliana is valuable as it attracts bees and other nectar loving insects during it flowering period. The larvae of some Lepidoptera also find its foliage appealing.

The Royal Horticultural Society have given Phlomis russeliana their prestigious Award of Garden Merit in 1993.

Phlomis russeliana requires little maintenance. Once the foliage becomes untidy, from late summer onwards, it may be cut back to encourage new growth. If left alone some people enjoy the form of this plant, especially during the snow when it appears as pom-pom balls raised on their stalks.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: