Search results for 'Papaveraceae'

Meconopsis paniculata

5 Aug

Meconopsis paniculata (07/06/2014, Kew gardens, London)

Meconopsis paniculata (07/06/2014, Kew gardens, London)

Position: Full sun to partial shade

Soil: Moist, well drained soil

Flowering period: Early summer

Eventual Height: 1.8m

Eventual Spread: 50cm

Hardiness: 6a, 6b, 7a, 7b, 8a, 8b, 9a, 9b

Family: Papaveraceae

Meconopsis paniculata is a deciduous short lived perennial with a clump forming, upright habit. It flowers in its final year of growth then dies. Its light green leaves are lanceolate, pinnately lobed, have a velvet texture, up to 45cm long and 12cm broad. Its yellow/ cream hermaphroditic flowers are saucer shaped, up to 5cm across and appear terminally on leafless stems.

Meconopsis paniculata Flower (07/06/2014, Kew gardens, London)

Meconopsis paniculata Flower (07/06/2014, Kew gardens, London)

Meconopsis paniculata, commonly known as the Panicled Yellow Poppy, is native to the Himalayas region ans north east India. In its native habitat it grows on grassy slopes and as a woodland understory plant.

The etymological root of the binomial name Meconopsis is derived from the Greek, mekon meaning ‘poppy’ and opsis meaning ‘looks like’. Paniculata is derived from the Latin meaning ‘flowers in panicles’.

Meconopsis paniculata may be useful to the landscape architect as part of a mixed herbaceous planting scheme or for planting within the dappled shade of trees.

Ecologically Meconopsis paniculata flowers are attractive to pollinating insects. beetles feed on the seed capsules and this plant is exceptionally attractive as food for terrestrial gastropods.

Meconopsis paniculata Leaf (07/06/2014, Kew gardens, London)

Meconopsis paniculata Leaf (07/06/2014, Kew gardens, London)

Meconopsis paniculata prefers moist, fertile, well-drained soils. It tolerates most pH of soil, although it prefers a neutral to acid pH.

Meconopsis paniculata requires no maintenance. After flowering this plant produces seed, unwanted seedlings may be removed.

Dicentra spectabilis ‘Alba’

15 May

Dicentra spectabilis 'Alba' (19/04/2014, Kew Gardens, London)

Dicentra spectabilis ‘Alba’ (19/04/2014, Kew Gardens, London)

Position: Full sun to partial shade

Flowering period: Spring to early summer

Soil: Moist, well drained

Eventual Height: 1.2m

Eventual Spread: 60cm

Hardiness: 4a, 4b, 5a, 5b, 6a, 6b, 7a, 7b, 8a, 8b

Family: Papaveraceae

Dicentra spectabilis ‘Alba’ is a deciduous herbaceous perennial with a clump forming pendulous habit. Its mid green leaves are compound three lobed. Its white flowers appear in racemes, each flower having two distinctive outer petals which form a pouch. Its fruit are plump pods which contain its seed. Its roots are fleshy rhizomes. This plant generally dies down to ground level during the summer months.

Dicentra spectabilis 'Alba' Flower (19/04/2014, Kew Gardens, London)

Dicentra spectabilis ‘Alba’ Flower (19/04/2014, Kew Gardens, London)

The species Dicentra spectabilis, commonly known as the Bleeding Heart or Dutchman’s Breeches, is native to Japan, Korea, north China and Siberia. In its native habitat it grows in moist woodlands. Dicentra spectabilis ‘Alba’ is synonymous with Lamprocapnos spectabilis ‘Alba’.

The etymological root of the binomial name Dicentra is derived from the Greek dis meaning ‘twice’ and kentron meaning ‘spurred’, in reference to the flower shape. Spectabilis is from the Latin meaning ‘outstanding’. Alba is from the Latin meaning ‘white’.

The landscape architect may find Dicentra spectabilis ‘Alba’ useful as a herbaceous perennial suitable for damp dappled shady locations. This plant should be situated carefully as it dies back during the summer months.

Ecologically, Dicentra spectabilis ‘Alba’ flowers are attractive to pollinating insects.

Dicentra spectabilis 'Alba' Leaf (19/04/2014, Kew Gardens, London)

Dicentra spectabilis ‘Alba’ Leaf (19/04/2014, Kew Gardens, London)

The Royal Horticultural Society has given Dicentra spectabilis ‘Alba’ (Lamprocapnos spectabilis ‘Alba’) their prestigious Award of Garden Merit in 1993.

Dicentra spectabilis ‘Alba’ prefers moist, humus rich, fertile, well-drained soils. It tolerates most pH of soil.

Dicentra spectabilis ‘Alba’ requires little maintenance. Large clumps may be divided in late autumn or early spring.

Davis Landscape Architecture

Argemone platyceras

11 Sep

Argemone platyceras (27/07/2013, Kew Gardens, London)

Argemone platyceras (27/07/2013, Kew Gardens, London)

Position: Full sun

Flowering period: Summer to early autumn

Soil: Moist, well drained

Eventual Height: 1m

Eventual Spread: 90cm

Hardiness: 8a, 8b, 9a, 9b, 10a, 10b

Family: Papaveraceae

Argemone platyceras is a short lived deciduous perennial. Its spiny blue green leaves are pinnatifid and up to 35cm long. Its white flowers have a yellow/ red centre, are solitary and up to 12cm across. Its fruit is a spiny capsule, up to 5cm long and 2.5cm broad.

Argemone platyceras Flower (27/07/2013, Kew Gardens, London)

Argemone platyceras Flower (27/07/2013, Kew Gardens, London)

Argemone platyceras, commonly known as Blessed Thistle, Prickly Poppy, Crested Poppy or Chicalote Poppy, is native Mexico. In its native habitat it grows in a prairie type habitat. Argemone platyceras is synonymous with Argemone mexicana var. aculeatissima

The etymological root of the binomial name Argemone is from the Greek and is a name given to plants by Dioscorides which were used to treat cataracts. Platyceras is derived from the Greek platus meaning ‘broad’ and kerasths meaning ‘horned’.

Argemone platyceras Leaf (27/07/2013, Kew Gardens, London)

Argemone platyceras Leaf (27/07/2013, Kew Gardens, London)

The landscape architect may find Argemone platyceras useful as a short lived perennial for a drought tolerant planting scheme. Once established this plant is drought tolerant.

Ecologically, Argemone platyceras flowers are attractive to pollinating insects.

Argemone platyceras prefers moist, well-drained soils. It tolerates most pH of soil. It will tolerate well drained sandy gravelly soils.

Argemone platyceras requires little maintenance. Seed heads may be removed to prevent excessive self seeding.

Argemone platyceras Seed Pod (27/07/2013, Kew Gardens, London)

Argemone platyceras Seed Pod (27/07/2013, Kew Gardens, London)



Davis Landscape Architecture

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