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Gaura lindheimeri ‘Whirling Butterflies’

27 Jul

Gaura lindheimeri 'Whirling Butterflies' (02/07/2016, Kew Gardens, London)

Gaura lindheimeri ‘Whirling Butterflies’ (02/07/2016, Kew Gardens, London)

Position: Full sun

Flowering period: Late spring to early autumn

Soil: Moist, well drained

Eventual Height: 100cm

Eventual Spread: 90cm

Hardiness: 7a, 7b, 8a, 8b, 9a, 9b, 10a

Family: Onagraceae

Gaura lindheimeri ‘Whirling Butterflies’ is a semi evergreen herbaceous perennial with a clump forming, spreading habit. Its mid green leaves are lanceolate with coarsely dentate margins, up to 9cm long and 13mm across. Its white flowers are up to 3cm across and appear on 80cm stalks above its leaves. Its roots emerge from rhizomes which aids its spread.

Gaura lindheimeri 'Whirling Butterflies' Flower (02/07/2016, Kew Gardens, London)

Gaura lindheimeri ‘Whirling Butterflies’ Flower (02/07/2016, Kew Gardens, London)

The species Gaura lindheimeri, commonly known as Lindheimer’s beeblossom, Lindheimer’s clockweed, Wand Flower and Indian feather, is native to Texas and Louisiana, USA. Gaura lindheimeri is synonymous with Oenothera lindheimeri.

The etymological root of the binomial name Gaura is derived from the Greek gauros meaning ‘superb’. Lindheimeri is named after Ferdinand Jacob Lindheimer (1801-1879), Texas plant collector.

The landscape architect may find Gaura lindheimeri ‘Whirling Butterflies’ useful as a long flowering perennial in a mixed perennial planting scheme or as an effective ground cover. Once established this perennial is drought tollerant.

Gaura lindheimeri 'Whirling Butterflies' Leaf (02/07/2016, Kew Gardens, London)

Gaura lindheimeri ‘Whirling Butterflies’ Leaf (02/07/2016, Kew Gardens, London)

Ecologically, Gaura lindheimeri ‘Whirling Butterflies’ flowers are attractive to polinating insects.

The Royal Horticultural Society have given the species Gaura lindheimeri their prestigious Award of Garden Merit in 1993.

Gaura lindheimeri ‘Whirling Butterflies’ prefers moist, fertile, well-drained soils. It tolerates most pH of soil.

Gaura lindheimeri ‘Whirling Butterflies’ requires little maintenance. Clumps may be cut back by a half in spring to promote a dense habit.

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Cercis canadensis ‘Forest Pansy’

6 Jul

Cercis canadensis 'Forest Pansy' (02/07/2016, Kew Gardens, London)

Cercis canadensis ‘Forest Pansy'(02/07/2016, Kew Gardens, London)

Position: Full sun to partial shade

Flowering period: Spring to early summer

Soil: Moist, well drained

Eventual Height: 9m

Eventual Spread: 10m

Hardiness: 4b, 5a, 5b, 6a, 6b, 7a, 7b, 8a, 8b

Family: Fabaceae

Cercis canadensis ‘Forest Pansy’ is a small deciduous tree or large shrub with a spreading sometimes multi-stemmed habit. It purple leaves are inversely heart shaped with entire margins, up to 12cm long and 12cm wide. Its bark is dark and smooth. Its dark pink to white flowers are pea like, up to 15mm long and appear before its leave in clusters on old wood. Its fruit is a pea like seed pod, when mature it is brown and up to 10cm long.

The species Cercis canadensis, commonly known as Eastern Redbud, is native to east North America. In its native habitat it grows within deciduous woodlands, usually as an understory plant or at their margins.

The etymological root of the binomial name Cercis was a name given to the plant by the ancient Greek philosopher Theophrastus. Canadensis is derived from the Latin meaning ‘from Canada’.

Cercis canadensis 'Forest Pansy' Leaf (02/07/2016, Kew Gardens, London)

Cercis canadensis ‘Forest Pansy’ Leaf (02/07/2016, Kew Gardens, London)

The landscape architect may find Cercis canadensis ‘Forest Pansy’ useful as a small tree with attractice spring flowers and purple leaves.

Ecologically, Cercis canadensis ‘Forest Pansy’ flowers will attract pollinating insects, including bees.

The Royal Horticultural Society have given Cercis canadensis ‘Forest Pansy’ their prestigious Award of Garden Merit 1993.

Cercis canadensis ‘Forest Pansy’ prefers moist, humus rich, well-drained soils. It tolerates most pH of soil.

Cercis canadensis ‘Forest Pansy’ requires little maintenance. Dead or damaged material may be removed at the end of winter.

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Viburnum macrocephalum ‘Sterile’

5 Jul

Viburnum macrocephalum 'Sterile' Wall Trained (22/05/2016, Kew Gardens, London)

Viburnum macrocephalum ‘Sterile’ Wall Trained (22/05/2016, Kew Gardens, London)

Position: Full sun to partial shade

Flowering period: Late spring to early summer

Soil: Moist, well drained

Eventual Height: 4m

Eventual Spread: 4m

Hardiness: 6a, 6b, 7a, 7b, 8a, 8b, 9a, 9b

Family: Adoxaceae

Viburnum macrocephalum ‘Sterile’ is a semi evergreen shrub with a rounded to vase shaped habit. Its dark green leaves are elliptic with serrulate margins, up to 10cm long and 4cm across. Its white sterile flowers are up to 3cm across and appear in dense globose clusters which are up to 20cm across.

Viburnum macrocephalum 'Sterile' Flower (22/05/2016, Kew Gardens, London)

Viburnum macrocephalum ‘Sterile’ Flower (22/05/2016, Kew Gardens, London)

The species Viburnum macrocephalum, commonly known as Chinese Snowball, is native to China. In its native habitat it grows in forests and thickets.

The etymological root of the binomial name Viburnum is derived from the classical Latin name for Wayfaring tree, Viburnum lantana. Macrocephalum is derived from the Latin macro meaning ‘large’ and cephalus meaning ‘a blockhead’, in reference to its large flowers.

The landscape architect may find Viburnum macrocephalum ‘Sterile’ useful as a shrub which produces many attractive flowers in late spring. It may also be trained as a hedge.

Viburnum macrocephalum 'Sterile' Leaf (22/05/2016, Kew Gardens, London)

Viburnum macrocephalum ‘Sterile’ Leaf (22/05/2016, Kew Gardens, London)

Ecologically, Viburnum macrocephalum ‘Sterile’ is of little value to wildlife.

Viburnum macrocephalum ‘Sterile’ prefers moist, fertile, well-drained soils. It tolerates most pH of soil.

Viburnum macrocephalum ‘Sterile’ requires little maintenance. Any necessary pruning should be carried out after flowering.

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Landscape Architecture

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