Phyllostachys flexuosa

22 Aug

Phyllostachys flexuosa (28/07/2014, Botanique National de Brest, France)

Phyllostachys flexuosa (28/07/2014, Botanique National de Brest, France)

Position: Sun to light shade

Flowering Period: N/A

Soil: Moist, well drained

Eventual Height: 6m

Eventual Spread: 2m

Hardiness: 6b, 7a, 7b, 8a, 8b, 9a, 9b

Family: Poaceae

Phyllostachys flexuosa is an evergreen, running bamboo with a spreading, arching habit. Its mid green  leaves are linear with entire margins and are up to 15cm long and 2cm broad. Its yellow/ green culms are slightly wavy, mature to dark green and are up to 4cm in diameter. Its culm sheaths are brown in colour. This plant spreads by underground rhizomes.

Phyllostachys flexuosa Leaf (28/07/2014, Botanique National de Brest, France)

Phyllostachys flexuosa Leaf (28/07/2014, Botanique National de Brest, France)

Phyllostachys flexuosa, commonly known as Sinuate Bamboo or Qiuganzhu, is native to China. In its native habitat it grows in monotypic stands of bamboo forest.

The etymological root of the binomial name Phyllostachys is derived from the Greek phyllon meaning ‘leaf’ and stachys meaning ‘spike’. Flexuosa is from the Latin flexuosus meaning ‘ with many curves’.

The landscape architect may find Phyllostachys flexuosa useful as a useful as a screening hedging plant that is low maintenance. Caution must be exercised when specifying this plant due to its potentially invasive nature. A root barrier may be used to contain its spread.

Ecologically, Phyllostachys flexuosa  is of little wildlife value in the UK.

Phyllostachys flexuosa Stem (28/07/2014, Botanique National de Brest, France)

Phyllostachys flexuosa Stem (28/07/2014, Botanique National de Brest, France)

Phyllostachys flexuosa prefers moist, humus rich, well-drained soils. It tolerates most pH of soil.

Phyllostachys flexuosa requires little to no maintenance. A root barrier may be installed at the time of planting to restrict the spread of this plant. The plant may be thinned out of required and spent canes may be cut back to the ground level.

Eucryphia glutinosa

21 Aug

Eucryphia glutinosa (28/07/2014, Botanique National de Brest, France)

Eucryphia glutinosa (28/07/2014, Botanique National de Brest, France)

Position: Full sun to partial shade

Flowering period: Summer

Soil: Moist, well drained

Eventual Height: 10m

Eventual Spread: 6m

Hardiness: 8a, 8b, 9a, 9b, 10a, 10b

Family: Cunoniaceae

Eucryphia glutinosa Flower (28/07/2014, Botanique National de Brest, France)

Eucryphia glutinosa Flower (28/07/2014, Botanique National de Brest, France)

Eucryphia glutinosa is a large deciduous shrub or small tree with an upright habit. Its glossy dark green leaves are odd pinnate and up to 6cm long. Its leaflets are elliptic with serrate margins. Its leaves turn orange/ red in autumn before they fall. Its fragrant white flowers are four petaled and up to 6cm across.

Eucryphia glutinosa, commonly known as Brush Bush or Nirrhe, is native to Chile. In its native habitat it grows in moist woodland habitats.

Eucryphia glutinosa Leaf (28/07/2014, Botanique National de Brest, France)

Eucryphia glutinosa Leaf (28/07/2014, Botanique National de Brest, France)

The etymological root of the binomial name Eucryphia is from the Greek eu meaning ‘well’ and krufaios meaning ‘hidden’. Glutinosa is derived from the Latin glutino meaning ’sticky’.

The landscape architect may find Eucryphia glutinosa useful as a late flowering upright small tree suitable for acidic soils. Its roots should be shaded from the sun.

Eucryphia glutinosa Bark (28/07/2014, Botanique National de Brest, France)

Eucryphia glutinosa Bark (28/07/2014, Botanique National de Brest, France)

Ecologically, Eucryphia glutinosa flowers are attractive to pollinating insects.

Eucryphia glutinosa prefers moist, fertile, well-drained soils. It prefers a neutral to acid pH of soil. It dislikes dry soils. It dislikes root disturbance.

Eucryphia glutinosa requires little maintenance.

Crocosmia x crocosmiiflora

20 Aug

Crocosmia x crocosmiiflora (28/08/2014, Rue de la Pointe Park, Brest, France)

Crocosmia x crocosmiiflora (28/08/2014, Rue de la Pointe Park, Brest, France)

Position: Full sun to partial shade

Flowering period: Summer

Soil: Moist, well drained

Eventual Height: 90cm

Eventual Spread: 40cm

Hardiness: 6a, 6b, 7a, 7b, 8a, 8b, 9a, 9b

Family: Iridaceae

Crocosmia x crocosmiiflora is a deciduous cormous perennial with a clump forming habit. It bright green erect leaves ere lanceolate with entire margins, basal and channeled. Its orange hermaphrodite flowers are funnel shaped, up t5cm long and appear as dense branching racemes. Its roots appear from corms which are up to 25mm across, these produce stolons with new corms and aids its spread.

Crocosmia x crocosmiiflora Flower (28/08/2014, Rue de la Pointe Park, Brest, France)

Crocosmia x crocosmiiflora Flower (28/08/2014, Rue de la Pointe Park, Brest, France)

The Crocosmia genus, commonly known as Montbretia is native to South Africa. In their native habitat they grow in  moist grassland. Crocosmia x crocosmiiflora is a cross between Crocosmia aurea with Crocosmia pottsii, produced by Victor Lemoine in 1880. It is considered an invasive species in New Zealand.

The etymological root of the binomial name Crocosmia is derived from the Greek krokos, meaning ‘saffron’, and osme, meaning ‘odour’. Crocosmiiflora is derived from the Latin meaning ‘flowers like a Crocosmia’.

The landscape architect may find Crocosmia x crocosmiiflora useful in an informal prairie scheme or as part of a mixed planting scheme. Once established it also drought tolerant.

Ecologically, Crocosmia x crocosmiiflora flowers are attractive to polinating insects.

The Royal Horticultural Society have given a number of varieties of Crocosmia x crocosmiiflora their prestigious Award of Garden Merit.

Crocosmia x crocosmiiflora Leaf (28/08/2014, Rue de la Pointe Park, Brest, France)

Crocosmia x crocosmiiflora Leaf (28/08/2014, Rue de la Pointe Park, Brest, France)

Crocosmia x crocosmiiflora prefers moist, fertile, well-drained soils. It tolerates most pH of soil.

Crocosmia x crocosmiiflora little maintenance. The foliage may be left on the plant over winter to protect the corms. The clumps may be divided in spring.

Agapanthus umbellatus

19 Aug

Agapanthus umbellatus (28/07/2014, Botanique National de Brest, France)

Agapanthus umbellatus (28/07/2014, Botanique National de Brest, France)

Position: Full sun

Soil: Well drained soil

Flowering period: Mid to late summer

Eventual Height: 1.2m

Eventual Spread: 60cm

Hardiness: 8a, 8b, 9a, 9b, 10a, 10b, 11a

Family: Amaryllidaceae

Agapanthus umbellatus is an evergreen perennial with a clump forming habit. Its dark green leaves composed of basal, linear leaves with simple margin. Its dark blue hermaphrodite flowers are tubular, arranged as rounded terminal umbles, up to 20cm across on upright stems. Its fruit are a three sided capsule which contain black shiny seeds. Its roots are rhizomes which aids its spread.

Agapanthus umbellatus Flower (28/07/2014, Botanique National de Brest, France)

Agapanthus umbellatus Flower (28/07/2014, Botanique National de Brest, France)

Agapanthus umbellatus, commonly known as the Lily of the Nile, Blue Giant African Lily is native to South Africa. In its native habitat it grows on moist grassland and slope.

The etymological root of the binomial name Agapanthus is derived from the Greek agap meaning ‘love’ and anthos meaning ‘flower’. Umbellatus is derived from the Latin umbella meaning ‘parasol’, in reference to the flower arrangement.

Agapanthus umbellatus may be useful to the landscape architect as a herbaceous perennial in maritime locations. Once established this plant is drought tolerant for short periods of time.

Ecologically, Agapanthus umbellatus flowers are attractive to many species of pollinating insects.

Agapanthus umbellatus Leaf (28/07/2014, Botanique National de Brest, France)

Agapanthus umbellatus Leaf (28/07/2014, Botanique National de Brest, France)

Agapanthus umbellatus prefers moist, fertile, well-drained soils. It tolerates most pH of soil.

Agapanthus umbellatus requires little maintenance. The plant may be cut back in autumn, if desired. They may be propagated from offsets or by dividing the rootstock in early spring or autumn.

Hydrangea paniculata ‘Kyushu’

18 Aug

Hydrangea paniculata 'Kyushu' (28/08/2014, Rue de la Pointe Park, Brest, France)

Hydrangea paniculata ‘Kyushu’ (28/08/2014, Rue de la Pointe Park, Brest, France)

Position: Full sun to dappled shade

Flowering period: Summer

Soil: Moist, well drained

Eventual Height: 3m

Eventual Spread: 3m

Hardiness: 4a, 4b, 5a, 5b, 6a, 6b, 7a, 7b, 8a, 8b, 9a

Family: Hydrangeaceae

Hydrangea paniculata ‘Kyushu’ is a deciduous shrub with an upright habit. Its mid green leaves are elliptic with mildly serrate margins, up to 14cm long and 6.5cm broad. Its white/ cream flowers appear as conical terminal panicles, up to 20cm long and is composed of sterile florets  surrounded by fertile florets.

Hydrangea paniculata 'Kyushu' Flower (28/08/2014, Rue de la Pointe Park, Brest, France)

Hydrangea paniculata ‘Kyushu’ Flower (28/08/2014, Rue de la Pointe Park, Brest, France)

The species, Hydrangea paniculata, commonly known as the Panicle Hydrangea, is native to south and east China, Japan, Korea and the eastern Russian island of Sakhalin. In its native habitat it grows in open forests and thickets.

The etymological root of the binomial name Hydrangea is derived from the Greek hydor meaning ‘water’ and aggos meaning ‘jar’ which refers to the plants cusp shaped fruit. Paniculata is derived from the Latin, referring to the inflorescence taking the form of panicles.

Hydrangea paniculata 'Kyushu' Leaf (28/08/2014, Rue de la Pointe Park, Brest, France)

Hydrangea paniculata ‘Kyushu’ Leaf (28/08/2014, Rue de la Pointe Park, Brest, France)

The landscape architect may find Hydrangea paniculata ‘Kyushu’ useful flowering shrub for shady location.

Ecologically, Hydrangea paniculata ‘Kyushu’ flowers are attractive to pollinating insects.

Hydrangea paniculata ‘Kyushu’ prefers moist, fertile, well-drained soils. It tolerates most pH of soil. It will not tolerate dry soils.

Hydrangea paniculata ‘Kyushu’ requires little maintenance. Pruning will produce fewer larger flowers and should be carried out in early spring.

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