Erythronium tuolumnense

16 Apr

 

Erythronium tuolumnense (16/03/2014, Kew Gardens, London)

Erythronium tuolumnense (16/03/2014, Kew Gardens, London)

Position: Partial shade

Flowering period: Spring

Soil: Moist, well drained

Eventual Height: 35cm

Eventual Spread: 20cm

Hardiness: 5a, 5b, 6a, 6b, 7a, 7b, 8a, 8b, 9a

Family: Liliaceae

Erythronium tuolumnense is a deciduous herbaceous, bulbous perennial with a clump forming habit. Its glossy mid green leaves appear in pairs, are elliptic to ovate with entire margins, up to 35cm long and 6cm broad. Its yellow flowers are Lilly like, up to 4cm across and appear in groups of up to five on long, naked reddish stalks. Its roots emerge from an oval shaped bulb which is up to 10cm across.

Erythronium tuolumnense Flower (16/03/2014, Kew Gardens, London)

Erythronium tuolumnense Flower (16/03/2014, Kew Gardens, London)

Erythronium tuolumnense, commonly known as the Tuolumne Fawn Lily or Tuolumne Dog’s Tooth Violet, is native to south west North America. In its native habitat it grows in moist deciduous woodland.

The etymological root of the binomial name Erythronium is derived from the Greek erythros meaning ‘red’, as to what the red refers to in this species we are unclear.Tuolumnense is derived from the Latin meaning ‘from Tuolumne County, California’, from where this plant originates.

The landscape architect may find Erythronium tuolumnense useful as a low growing herbaceous perennial, as part of a mixed herbaceous border.

Ecologically, Erythronium tuolumnense flowers are attractive to pollinating insects. Some mammals eat the bulbs of this plant.

Erythronium tuolumnense Leaf (16/03/2014, Kew Gardens, London)

Erythronium tuolumnense Leaf (16/03/2014, Kew Gardens, London)

The Royal Horticultural Society has given the species  Erythronium tuolumnense  their prestigious Award of Garden Merit in 1993.

Erythronium tuolumnense  prefers moist, humus rich fertile, well-drained soils. It tolerates most pH of soil. It dislikes dry soils.

Erythronium tuolumnense requires little maintenance. Large clumps may be divided after flowering.

Arum creticum

15 Apr

 

Arum creticum (16/03/2014, Kew Gardens, London)

Arum creticum (16/03/2014, Kew Gardens, London)

Position: Full sun to partial shade

Flowering period: Spring

Soil: Moist, well drained

Eventual Height: 40cm

Eventual Spread: 40cm

Hardiness: 8a, 8b, 9a, 9b, 10a, 10b

Family: Araceae

Arum creticum is a deciduous herbaceous, perennial. Its mid green glossy leaves are simple, arrow shaped with entire margins, up to 30cm long. Its leaves appear in the winter and wither during the warm summer months. Its fragrant  cream/ yellow solitary flowers appear in spathes, are funnel shaped with a prominent yellow spadix and up to 13cm long. Its roots are fleshy rhizomes.

Arum creticum Flower (16/03/2014, Kew Gardens, London)

Arum creticum Flower (16/03/2014, Kew Gardens, London)

Arum creticum, commonly known as Cretan Arum, is native to Greece and Turkey, including Crete. In its native habitat it grows rocky slops and among scrubby vegetation.

The etymological root of the binomial name Arum is derived from Arom, a name given to Arum italicum by Theophrastus. Creticum is derived from the Latin meaning ‘from Crete, Greece’.

The landscape architect may find Arum creticum useful as part of herbaceous planting scheme, although care should be taken as it may leave a hole in you scheme when the leaves die down during the summer. It prefers a sheltered position.

Arum creticum Leaf (16/03/2014, Kew Gardens, London)

Arum creticum Leaf (16/03/2014, Kew Gardens, London)

Ecologically, Arum creticum is attractive to bees an pollinating insects.

Arum creticum prefers moist, fertile, well-drained soils. It tolerates most pH of soil.

Arum creticum requires little maintenance. Large clumps may be divided in spring.

Pyrus pashia

14 Apr

 

Pyrus pashia (16/03/2014, Kew Gardens, London)

Pyrus pashia (16/03/2014, Kew Gardens, London)

Position: Full sun to light shade

Flowering period: Spring

Soil: Moist, well drained

Eventual Height: 10m

Eventual Spread: 6m

Hardiness: 5b, 6a, 6b, 7a, 7b, 8a, 8b, 9a, 9b

Family: Rosaceae

Pyrus pashia is a deciduous tree with an oval shaped crown. Its glossy dark green leaves are ovate with serrulate margins, up to 7cm long and 5cm broad. Its leaves turn yellow/ red in autumn before they fall. Its white hermaphrodite flowers are up to 3cm across. Its green fruit is an edible ovoid pome which is up to 4cm across, 5cm long and matures is autumn. Its fruit is most edible when partially decayed.

Pyrus pashia Flowers (16/03/2014, Kew Gardens, London)

Pyrus pashia Flowers (16/03/2014, Kew Gardens, London)

Pyrus pashia, commonly known as Wild Himalayan Pear, Punjabi Pear or Indian Wild Pear, is native to south Asia, from Pakistan to Vietnam.

The etymological root of the binomial name Pyrus is the classical name for the Pear tree.Pashia is derived from the Nepalese name for this tree.

The landscape architect may find Pyrus pashia useful as an attractive spring flowering tree with interesting leaf colour in autumn and edible fruit. This tree is tolerant of atmospheric pollution. It is a suitable tree for a wild life garden.

Pyrus pashia Bark (16/03/2014, Kew Gardens, London)

Pyrus pashia Bark (16/03/2014, Kew Gardens, London)

Ecologically, Pyrus pashia flowers are attractive to pollinating insects. The fruit of this tree is attractive to some birds and mammals.

Pyrus pashia prefers moist, fertile, well-drained soils. It tolerates most pH of soil.

Pyrus pashia requires little maintenance.

Burgess Park Over 5′s Play Area, Walworth, London

11 Apr

The over 5′s playground area was opened in 2012 as part of the first phase of the redevelopment of Burgess Park. The playground combines natural play items such as rocks, wooden ‘log piles’ and land form with more structured play element such as a slide, zip wire and climbing ropes. I think the omission of the swing is a bit of a shame.

Burgess Park Play Area, Walworth, London - Overview

Burgess Park Play Area, Walworth, London – Overview

Burgess Park Play Area, Walworth, London - General View

Burgess Park Play Area, Walworth, London – General View

Burgess Park Play Area, Walworth, London - Race Track Markings

Burgess Park Play Area, Walworth, London – Race Track Markings

Burgess Park Play Area, Walworth, London - Slide on Bank

Burgess Park Play Area, Walworth, London – Slide on Bank

Burgess Park Play Area, Walworth, London - Grass Bank with Climbing Ropes

Burgess Park Play Area, Walworth, London – Grass Bank with Climbing Ropes

Burgess Park Play Area, Walworth, London - Climbing Net

Burgess Park Play Area, Walworth, London – Climbing Net

Burgess Park Play Area, Walworth, London - Zip Wire

Burgess Park Play Area, Walworth, London – Zip Wire

Burgess Park Play Area, Walworth, London - General Race Track

Burgess Park Play Area, Walworth, London – General Race Track

Burgess Park Play Area, Walworth, London - Climbing Rocks

Burgess Park Play Area, Walworth, London – Climbing Rocks

Burgess Park Play Area, Walworth, London - Climbing Log Piles

Burgess Park Play Area, Walworth, London – Climbing Log Piles

Burgess Park Play Area, Walworth, London - Bridge Over Swale

Burgess Park Play Area, Walworth, London – Bridge Over Swale

The map below by Google is in the correct location but yet to be updated to show the latest park in this location.

Erythronium grandiflorum

10 Apr

 

Erythronium grandiflorum (16/03/2014, Kew Gardens, London)

Erythronium grandiflorum (16/03/2014, Kew Gardens, London)

Position: Partial shade

Flowering period: Spring

Soil: Moist, well drained

Eventual Height: 30cm

Eventual Spread: 25cm

Hardiness: 4b, 5a, 5b, 6a, 6b, 7a, 7b, 8a, 8b, 9a, 9b

Family: Liliaceae

Erythronium grandiflorum is a deciduous herbaceous, bulbous perennial with a clump forming habit. Its mid green leaves appear in pairs, are lanceolate with entire margins, up to 20cm long and 6cm broad. Its yellow scented flowers are Lilly like, up to 35mm across and appear in groups of up to five on long, naked stalks. Its roots emerge from an oval shaped bulb which is up to 5cm across.

Erythronium grandiflorum Flower (16/03/2014, Kew Gardens, London)

Erythronium grandiflorum Flower (16/03/2014, Kew Gardens, London)

Erythronium grandiflorum, commonly known as the Yellow Avalanche Lily or Glacier Lily, is native to west North America. In its native habitat it grows in sualpine meadows and woodland clearings and flowers as the snow melts.

The etymological root of the binomial name Erythronium is derived from the Greek erythros meaning ‘red’, as to what the red refers to in this species we are unclear. Grandiflorum is from the Latin grandis meaning ‘large’ and

As Erythronium grandiflorum is rarely cultivated as it is difficult to grow outside of its preferred habitat. When available landscape architect may find useful as a low growing herbaceous perennial, as part of a mixed herbaceous border.

Erythronium grandiflorum Leaf (16/03/2014, Kew Gardens, London)

Erythronium grandiflorum Leaf (16/03/2014, Kew Gardens, London)

Ecologically,  Erythronium  grandiflorum flowers are attractive to pollinating insects. In its native habitat the bulbs of this plant are eaten by bears, and other mammals.

Erythronium grandiflorum prefers moist, humus rich fertile, well-drained soils. It tolerates most pH of soil. It dislikes dry soils.

Erythronium grandiflorum requires little maintenance. Large clumps may be divided after flowering.

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 190 other followers

%d bloggers like this: