Cunninghamia konishii hayata

1 Sep

Cunninghamia konishii hayata (28/08/2014, Rue de la Pointe Park, Brest, France)

Cunninghamia konishii hayata (28/08/2014, Rue de la Pointe Park, Brest, France)

Position: Full sun to partial shade

Flowering period: Insignificant, male flowers in May

Soil: Moist, well-drained

Eventual Height: 40m

Eventual Spread: 9m

Hardiness: 6b, 7a, 7b, 8a, 8b, 9a, 9b

Family: Cupressaceae

Cunninghamia konishii hayata is a fast growing evergreen coniferous tree with a columnar, upright habit and drooping branches. Its blue/ green leathery leaves are are needle like, spirally arranged, up to 7cm long and 3 5mm broad. Its red/ brown bark is longitudinally fissured , then cracking into irregular flakes. Its monoecious pollen cones are small and inconspicuous and produced in May. Its seed cones are green initially, turning brown with age.

Cunninghamia konishii hayata Leaf (28/08/2014, Rue de la Pointe Park, Brest, France)

Cunninghamia konishii hayata Leaf (28/08/2014, Rue de la Pointe Park, Brest, France)

Cunninghamia konishii hayata, commonly known as Hayata Tree, is native to Taiwan. In its native habitat it grows in mixed woodland in small stands. This tree is classified as Endangered according to The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species.

The etymological root of the binomial name Cunninghamia is named after the British Doctor, Dr. James Cunningham, who introduced this species into cultivation in 1702. Konishii may be derived from the Japanese meaning ‘small west’, reader feedback as always would be welcome.

When available the landscape architect may find Cunninghamia konishii hayata  useful as a large, evergreen, attractive specimen tree in a parkland setting. It does not like exposure to drying winds.

Ecologically, Cunninghamia konishii hayata is of little value to UK wild life.

Cunninghamia konishii hayata Bark (28/08/2014, Rue de la Pointe Park, Brest, France)

Cunninghamia konishii hayata Bark (28/08/2014, Rue de la Pointe Park, Brest, France)

Cunninghamia konishii hayata prefers moist, fertile, well-drained soils. It tolerates most pH of soil. It dislikes dry soils.

Cunninghamia konishii hayata requires  little maintenance.

Eupatorium ligustrinum

29 Aug

Eupatorium ligustrinum (28/08/2014, Rue de la Pointe Park, Brest, France)

Eupatorium ligustrinum (28/08/2014, Rue de la Pointe Park, Brest, France)

Position: Full sun to partial shade

Flowering period: Late summer to autumn

Soil: Moist, well drained

Eventual Height: 2m

Eventual Spread: 2m

Hardiness: 9a, 9b, 10a, 10b, 11, 12

Family: Asteraceae

Eupatorium ligustrinum is an evergreen shrub with a bushy, domed habit. Its mid green glossy leaves are elliptic to lance shaped with serrate margins, up to 10cm long and 4cm broad. Its white/ pink flowers appear in terminal corymbs which are up to 20cm across.

Eupatorium ligustrinum Flower (28/08/2014, Rue de la Pointe Park, Brest, France)

Eupatorium ligustrinum Flower (28/08/2014, Rue de la Pointe Park, Brest, France)

Eupatorium ligustrinum,  commonly known as Privet Leaved Ageratina, Ague Weed, Incense Bush or Thorough Wort, is native to south North America, including Mexico and Costa Rica. Eupatorium ligustrinum is synonymous with Ageratina ligustrina.

The etymological root of the binomial name  Eupatorium is derived from the Greek name for the King of Pontus, Mithridates VI Eupator. Ligustrinum is from the name Ligustrum, another plant with similar leaves.

The landscape architect may find Eupatorium ligustrinum useful as a late flowering medium sized evergreen shrub.

Ecologically, Eupatorium ligustrinum flowers are very attractive to pollinating insects.

Eupatorium ligustrinum Leaf (28/08/2014, Rue de la Pointe Park, Brest, France)

Eupatorium ligustrinum Leaf (28/08/2014, Rue de la Pointe Park, Brest, France)

Eupatorium ligustrinum prefers moist, humus rich, well-drained soils. It tolerates most pH of soil. It dislikes dry soils.

Eupatorium ligustrinum requires little to no maintenance.

Malvastrum lateritium

28 Aug

Malvastrum lateritium (28/07/2014, Rue de la Pointe Park, Brest, France)

Malvastrum lateritium (28/07/2014, Rue de la Pointe Park, Brest, France)

Position: Full sun

Flowering period: Summer to early autumn

Soil: Moist, well drained

Eventual Height: 40cm

Eventual Spread: 1.2m

Hardiness: 7b, 8a, 8b, 9a, 9b, 10a

Family: Malvaceae

Malvastrum lateritium is a semi evergreen perennial with a spreading habit . Its dark green leaves are palmate with serrate margins, up to 8cm long and 7cm broad. Its orange/ pink hermaphrodite flowers are saucer shaped and up to 5cm across. Its stems may root where the stems touch the ground.

Malvastrum lateritium Flower (28/07/2014, Rue de la Pointe Park, Brest, France)

Malvastrum lateritium Flower (28/07/2014, Rue de la Pointe Park, Brest, France)

Malvastrum lateritium, commonly known as Creeping Mallow, is native to south South America, including Argentina.

The etymological root of the binomial name Malvastrum is named after the Malva plant, due to its similarity. Lateritium is derived from the Latin later meaning ‘brick’, in reference to the flower’s colour.

The landscape architect may find Malvastrum lateritium useful as a free flowering ground cover perennial.

Ecologically, Malvastrum lateritium flowers are attractive to pollinating insects.

Malvastrum lateritium Leaf (28/07/2014, Rue de la Pointe Park, Brest, France)

Malvastrum lateritium Leaf (28/07/2014, Rue de la Pointe Park, Brest, France)

Malvastrum lateritium prefers moist, fertile, well-drained soils. It tolerates most pH of soil. It dislikes dry soils.

Malvastrum lateritium requires little maintenance.

Clethra acuminata

27 Aug

Clethra acuminata (28/08/2014, Rue de la Pointe Park, Brest, France)

Clethra acuminata (28/08/2014, Rue de la Pointe Park, Brest, France)

Position: Full sun to dappled shade

Flowering period: Summer

Soil: Moist, well drained

Eventual Height: 4m

Eventual Spread: 4m

Hardiness: 5b, 6a, 6b, 7a, 7b, 8a, 8b, 9a, 9b

Family: Clethraceae

Clethra acuminata is a deciduous shrub with a tiered, bushy habit. Its mid green leaves are ovate with serrate margins, up to 15cm long and 5cm broad. Its leaves turn yellow before they fall in autumn. Its bark exfoliates to reveal a cinnamon colored inner bark with age. Its fragrant white/ cream flowers appear as long racemes which are up to 20cm long. Its blue/ black fruit appear as small capsules. Its roots may produce suckers.

Clethra acuminata Flower (28/08/2014, Rue de la Pointe Park, Brest, France)

Clethra acuminata Flower (28/08/2014, Rue de la Pointe Park, Brest, France)

Clethra acuminata, commonly known as Cinnamon Bark Clethra or Mountain Pepperbush, is native to north east USA in the south Appalachian Mountains. In its native habitat it grows as an understory shrub and in stream side locations.

The etymological root of the binomial name Clethra is derived from the ancient Greek klhqrh, a name given to Alder, the leaves of which resemble this plant. Acuminata is derived from the Latin acuminatus meaning ‘sharp’ or ‘pointed’.

The landscape architect may find Clethra acuminata useful as a large deciduous shrub with attractive fragrant flowers and attractive autumn leaf colour.

Ecologically, Clethra acuminata flowers are attractive to polinating insects. Its seeds are also attractive to some birds.

Clethra acuminata Leaf (28/08/2014, Rue de la Pointe Park, Brest, France)

Clethra acuminata Leaf (28/08/2014, Rue de la Pointe Park, Brest, France)

Clethra acuminata prefers moist, humus rich, well-drained soils. It prefers a neutral to acid pH of soil.

Clethra acuminata requires little maintenance. Suckers may be removed as necessary.

Chusquea gigantea

26 Aug

Chusquea gigantea (28/08/2014, Rue de la Pointe Park, Brest, France)

Chusquea gigantea (28/08/2014, Rue de la Pointe Park, Brest, France)

Position: Full sun to light shade

Flowering period: N/A

Soil: Moist, well drained

Eventual Height: 15m

Eventual Spread: 2m

Hardiness: 6b, 7a, 7b, 8a, 8b, 9a, 9b, 10a, 10b, 11

Family: Poaceae

Chusquea gigantea is an evergreen, fast growing bamboo with a clump, upright forming habit. Its mid green leaves are lanceolate with entire margins, a pointed tip, up to 12cm long and 1cm broad. Its yellow/ green canes are straight and solid and up to 6cm in diameter. Its flowers are in the form of a panicle and like most bamboos it will die after flowering. Its roots produce rhizomes which aids its slow spread.

Chusquea gigantea Stem (28/08/2014, Rue de la Pointe Park, Brest, France)

Chusquea gigantea Stem (28/08/2014, Rue de la Pointe Park, Brest, France)

Chusquea gigantea, commonly known as the Giant Chusquea Bamboo, is native to south South America. In its native habitat it grows in temperate forests.

The etymological root of the binomial name Chusquea is derived from the vernacular name Chusque, a name given to one of the members of this genus in South America. Gigantea is from the Latin meaning ‘like that of the Giants’.

The landscape architect may find Chusquea gigantea useful as a specimen bamboo or as an evergreen informal hedge. This bamboo is very tolerant of maritime conditions. Once established this bamboo is drought tolerant.

Ecologically, Chusquea gigantea is of little value in the UK.

Chusquea gigantea Leaf (28/08/2014, Rue de la Pointe Park, Brest, France)

Chusquea gigantea Leaf (28/08/2014, Rue de la Pointe Park, Brest, France)

The Royal Horticultural Society has given Chusquea gigantea their prestigious Award of Garden Merit in 2012.

Chusquea gigantea prefers moist, fertile, humus rich, well-drained soils. It tolerates most pH of soil.

Chusquea gigantea requires little maintenance.

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