Callistemon viridiflorus

29 Jul

Callistemon viridiflorus (07/06/2014, Kew Gardens, London)

Callistemon viridiflorus (07/06/2014, Kew Gardens, London)

Position: Full sun to partial shade

Soil: Moist, well drained

Flowering period: Summer

Eventual Height: 2.5m

Eventual Spread: 2m

Hardiness: 8a, 8b, 9a, 9b, 10a, 10b

Family: Myrtaceae

Callistemon viridiflorus is an evergreen shrub or tree with an open habit. Its grey/ green leaves are linear to lanceolate with entire margins, up t0 35mm long and are aromatic when crushed. Its branches develop rough white bark as it matures. It bears bottle brush like spikes of hermaphrodite flowers with enlarged cream/ green stamens arranged radially around the tips of the flowering stems and are up to 7.5cm long. Its fruit are dark, tightly spaced small fruit.

Callistemon viridiflorus Flower (07/06/2014, Kew Gardens, London)

Callistemon viridiflorus Flower (07/06/2014, Kew Gardens, London)

Callistemon viridiflorus,  commonly known as the Green Bottlebrush, is native to Tasmania. In its native habitat it grows in mountain rain forests.

The etymological root of the binomial name Callistemon is derived from the ancient Greek Kalli meaning ‘beautiful’ and stamen the pollen producing part of a flower. Viridiflorus is derived from the Latin viridis meaning ‘green and flora meaning ‘flower’.

The Landscape architect may find Callistemon viridiflorus useful as an attractive medium sized evergreen shrub with showy green flowers. A warm sheltered location will ensure this plant flowers prolifically. Once established this shrub is drought tollerant. This shrub is not attractive to deer or rabbits.

Callistemon viridiflorus Leaf (07/06/2014, Kew Gardens, London)

Callistemon viridiflorus Leaf (07/06/2014, Kew Gardens, London)

Ecologically,  Callistemon citrinus flowers are attractive to pollinating insects.

Callistemon viridiflorus prefers moist, fertile, well-drained soils. It tolerates most pH of soil.

Callistemon viridiflorus  requires little to no maintenance, dead or damaged material may be removed after flowering.

Iris sibirica ‘White Swirl’

28 Jul

Iris sibirica 'White Swirl' (07/06/2014, Kew Gardens, London)

Iris sibirica ‘White Swirl’ (07/06/2014, Kew Gardens, London)

Position: Full sun to light shade

Flowering period: Late spring to early summer

Soil: Moist, well drained

Eventual Height: 1.2m

Eventual Spread: 60cm

Hardiness: 4a, 4b, 5a, 5b, 6a, 6b, 7a, 7b, 8a, 8b, 9a, 9b

Family: Iridaceae

Iris sibirica ‘White Swirl’ is a deciduous herbaceous perennial with an erect clump forming habit. Its grey/ green leaves are lanceolate with entire margins and gradually narrowing to a point, up to 80cm long and 4cm broad at their base. Its white hermaphrodite flowers are up to 7cm across, emerge from a branched stem which emerges from the base of the leaf cluster. Its fruit is a loculicidal capsule and up to 4cm long. Its roots are below ground rhizomes which allow this plant to steadily spread.

Iris sibirica 'White Swirl' Flower (07/06/2014, Kew Gardens, London)

Iris sibirica ‘White Swirl’ Flower (07/06/2014, Kew Gardens, London)

The species Iris sibirica, commonly known as the Siberian Iris or Siberian Flag, is native to Russia, east and central Europe and north east Turkey. In its native habitat it grows in damp woodlands and damp meadows.

The etymological root of the binomial name Iris is derived from the Greek word for a rainbow, referring to the wide variety of flower colours found among the many species.

The landscape architect may find Iris sibirica ‘White Swirl’ useful as an attractive herbaceous perennial with white. It is suitable for planting in damp locations including boggy ground and stream margins.

Iris sibirica 'White Swirl' Leaf (07/06/2014, Kew Gardens, London)

Iris sibirica ‘White Swirl’ Leaf (07/06/2014, Kew Gardens, London)

Ecologically, Iris sibirica ‘White Swirl’ is attractive to bees and pollinating insects.

Iris sibirica ‘White Swirl’ prefers moist, fertile, well-drained soils. It tolerates most pH of soil. It will tolerate wet soils.

Iris sibirica ‘White Swirl’ requires little maintenance. Large clumps may be divided in autumn.

Campanula incurva

25 Jul

Campanula incurva (07/06/2014, Kew Gardens, London)

Campanula incurva (07/06/2014, Kew Gardens, London)

Position: Full sun to partial shade

Flowering period: Summer

Soil: Moist, well drained

Eventual Height: 30cm

Eventual Spread: 50cm

Hardiness: 5b, 6a, 6b, 7a, 7b, 8a, 8b, 9a, 9b, 10a

Family: Campanulaceae

Campanula incurva is a short lived evergreen herbaceous perennial with a sprawling habit. Its dark green leaves are lanceolate with entire margins, up to 4cm long and 15mm broad. Its light blue flowers are cup shaped, up to 7cm long and 4cm across.

Campanula incurva Flower (07/06/2014, Kew Gardens, London)

Campanula incurva Flower (07/06/2014, Kew Gardens, London)

Campanula incurva, commonly known as Evia Bellflower, is native to east Greece, Europe. In its native habitat it grows in rocky places among scrub. Campanula incurva is synonymous with Campanula leutweinii.

The etymological root of the binomial name Campanula is derived from the Latin campana meaning ‘bell’. Incurva is from the Latin meaning ‘curved’.

The landscape architect may find Campanula incurva useful as a short lived evergreen perennial with attractive flowers suitable for well drained soils.

Campanula incurva Leaf (07/06/2014, Kew Gardens, London)

Campanula incurva Leaf (07/06/2014, Kew Gardens, London)

Ecologically, Campanula incurva flowers are attractive to pollinating insects.

Campanula incurva prefers moist, fertile, well-drained soils. It tolerates most pH of soil.

Campanula incurva requires little maintenance.

Salvia officinalis ‘Icterina’

24 Jul

Salvia officinalis 'Icterina' (07/06/2014, Kew Gardens, London)

Salvia officinalis ‘Icterina’ (07/06/2014, Kew Gardens, London)

Position: Full sun to partial shade

Flowering period: Summer (occasionally)

Soil: Moist, well drained

Eventual Height: 60cm

Eventual Spread: 60cm

Hardiness: 5b, 6a, 6b, 7a, 7b, 8a, 8b, 9a, 9b

Family: Lamiaceae

Salvia officinalis ‘Icterina’ is an evergreen sub shrub with a domed habit. Its grey/ green leaves have irregular yellow margins, are elliptic with entire margins, up to 7cm long and 2.5cm broad. Its leaves are aromatic when crushed. Mature plants may form a woody stem. Its blue/ purple flowers are two lipped, up to 2cm long and appear on short terminal racemes.

The species Salvia officinalis, commonly known as Common Sage or Garden Sage, is native to to the Mediterranean region. In its native habitat it grows on dry banks and stoney places.

The etymological root of the binomial name Salvia is derived from the Latin salvare, meaning to ‘heal’, in reference to the use of Salvia vulgaris as a medicinal plant. Officinalis is derived from the Latin translating as ‘of the shop’.

The landscape architect may find Salvia officinalis ‘Icterina’ useful as a ground cover plant with variegated leaves. This plant is not attractive to deer. Once established this plant is drought tollerant.

Ecologically, Salvia officinalis ‘Icterina’ flowers are attractive to pollinating insects.

Salvia officinalis 'Icterina' Leaf (07/06/2014, Kew Gardens, London)

Salvia officinalis ‘Icterina’ Leaf (07/06/2014, Kew Gardens, London)

The Royal Horticultural Society has given Salvia officinalis ‘Icterina’ their prestigious Award of Garden Merit in 1993.

Salvia officinalis ‘Icterina’ prefers moist, fertile, well-drained soils. It tolerates most pH of soil, although it prefers a neutral to alkali p of soil. It dislikes wet soils.

Salvia officinalis ‘Icterina’ requires little maintenance. If required pruning should be carried out in spring before active growth starts.

Hypericum polyphyllum

23 Jul

Hypericum polyphyllum (07/06/2014, Kew Gardens, London)

Hypericum polyphyllum (07/06/2014, Kew Gardens, London)

Position: Full sun

Flowering period: Summer

Soil: Moist, well drained

Eventual Height: 45cm

Eventual Spread: 60m

Hardiness: 7a, 7b, 8a, 8b, 9a, 9b, 10a, 10b

Family: Hypericaceae

Hypericum polyphyllum is a evergreen shrub with  bushy, spreading  habit. Its dark blue/ green leaves are elliptic with entire margins, up to 3cm long and 1cm broad. Its yellow flowers are bowl shaped, have five petals, prominent stamens and are up to 5cm across.

Hypericum polyphyllum Flower (07/06/2014, Kew Gardens, London)

Hypericum polyphyllum Flower (07/06/2014, Kew Gardens, London)

Hypericum polyphyllum, commonly known as Rockery St John’s Wort, is native to Turkey. In its native habitat it grows on sandy, stoney place, often calcareous soils in scrub.

The etymological root of the binomial name Hypericum is derived from the Greek meaning ‘above pictures’, in reference to this plants use over shrines to repel evil spirits.Polyphyllumis derived from the Greek polys meaning ‘many’ and phyllon meaning ‘leaf’.

The landscape architect may find Hypericum polyphyllum useful as a ground cover shrub for very well drained soils. It may be used as a specimen shrub in rock gardens. Once established this shrub is drought tolerant.

Hypericum polyphyllum Leaf (07/06/2014, Kew Gardens, London)

Hypericum polyphyllum Leaf (07/06/2014, Kew Gardens, London)

Ecologically,  Hypericum polyphyllum flowers are attractive to pollinating insects.

Hypericum polyphyllum  prefers moist, well-drained soils. It prefers a neutral to alkali pH of soil.

Hypericum polyphyllum requires little maintenance.

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