Eucalyptus delegatensis

7 Apr

Eucalyptus delegatensis (11/03/2012, Kew, London)

Eucalyptus delegatensis (11/03/2012, Kew, London)

Position: Full sun

Flowering period: Mid summer

Soil: Moist, well drained

Eventual Height: 60m

Eventual Spread: 20m

Hardiness: 7b, 8a, 8b, 9a, 9b, 10a, 10b, 11

Family: Myrtaceae

Eucalyptus delegatensis is a large evergreen upright tree. As with most Eucalyptus trees it produces both juvenile and mature forms of its leaves. They are both grey/ green, with the juvenile being up to 25cm long and 10cm broad  the mature 18cm long and 3cm broad. Its trunk is straight and its bark is thick orange and fibrous at the base and smooth on younger branches. Its white flowers an appear in clusters of  up to 15 along the length of the branches and usually appear in the leaf axils. Once fertilised these mature into cup shaped glaucous seed capsules.

Eucalyptus delegatensis Leaf (11/03/2012, Kew, London)

Eucalyptus delegatensis Leaf (11/03/2012, Kew, London)

Eucalyptus delegatensis, commonly known as Alpine Ash, Mountain Ash, Gum-topped Stringybark or White Top, is native to south east Australia’s mountainous regions. E. delegatensis is synonymous with Eucalyptus gigantea.

The etymological root of the binomial name Eucalyptus is derived from the Greek eu ‘good‘ and kalyptos ’covered’ referring to the calyx which forms a lid over the flowers when in bud. Delegatensis is derived from the Latin meaning ‘from Delegate, New South Wales’.

Eucalyptus delegatensis Bark (11/03/2012, Kew, London)

Eucalyptus delegatensis Bark (11/03/2012, Kew, London)

The landscape architect may find Eucalyptus delegatensis useful as a large, upright evergreen specimen tree.

Ecologically,  Eucalyptus delegatensis  is attractive to bees.

Eucalyptus  delegatensis prefers moist, well-drained, soils. It will tolerate most pH of soil.

Eucalyptus delegatensis requires little maintenance.

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