Paulownia kawakamii

2 Jul

Paulownia kawakamii (23/05/2015, Kew Gardens, London)

Paulownia kawakamii (23/05/2015, Kew Gardens, London)

Position: Full sun

Soil: Moist, well drained

Flowering period: Late spring

Eventual Height: 12m

Eventual Spread: 10m

Hardiness: 6a, 6b, 7a, 7b, 8a, 8b, 9a, 9b, 10a, 10b

Family: Paulowniaceae

Paulownia kawakamii Flower (23/05/2015, Kew Gardens, London)

Paulownia kawakamii Flower (23/05/2015, Kew Gardens, London)

Paulownia kawakamii is a fast growing deciduous tree with an umbellate crown. Its mid green leaves are cordate with entire margins, hairy above and below, up to 8cm long and 6cm across. Its fragrant violet flowers have purple and yellow marks inside, are up to 5cm across and are borne as upright panicles. Its roots are deep rooting.

Paulownia kawakamii Leaf (23/05/2015, Kew Gardens, London)

Paulownia kawakamii Leaf (23/05/2015, Kew Gardens, London)

Paulownia kawakamii, commonly known as Sapphire Dragon Tree, is native to east China, Taiwan and Japan. In its native habitat it grows in mixed deciduous forests. This tree is classified as critically endangered according to the IUCN Red List.

The etymological root of the binomial name Paulownia is named in honor of Anna Paulowna, a princess of The Netherlands. Kawakamii is named after Takiya Kawakamii (1871 – 1915), a Japanese botanist.

Paulownia kawakamii Fruit (19/09/2015, Kew Gardens, London)

Paulownia kawakamii Fruit (19/09/2015, Kew Gardens, London)

The landscape architect may find Paulownia kawakamii is useful as an attractive spring flowering tree. Once established this tree is drought tollerant.

Ecologically,  Paulownia kawakamii flowers are attractive to pollinating insects.

Paulownia kawakamii Bark (23/05/2015, Kew Gardens, London)

Paulownia kawakamii Bark (23/05/2015, Kew Gardens, London)

Paulownia kawakamii  prefers moist, fertile, well-drained soils. It tolerates most pH of soil.

Paulownia kawakamii requires little maintenance. Dead or damaged branches may be removed in late winter to early spring. If this tree is pollarded its new growth produces a crown with much larger leaves (up to 60cm long).

DAVIS Landscape Architecture

Landscape Architecture

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: