Callitris rhomboidea

26 Nov

Callitris rhomboidea (08/11/2015, Kew Gardens, London)

Callitris rhomboidea (08/11/2015, Kew Gardens, London)

Position: Full sun to light shade

Flowering period: Spring

Soil: Moist, well drained

Eventual Height: 15m

Eventual Spread: 5m

Hardiness: 8b, 9a, 9b, 10a, 10b, 11

Family: Cupressaceae

Callitris rhomboidea is a fast growing tree with an upright habit. Its light green/ glaucus leaves are up to 3mm long and appear as slender prays. Its trunk may achieve a diameter of up to 40cm. This tree is monoecious with its flowers appear at the tips of fruiting branches. Its fruit is a globose cone and up to 2cm across.

Callitris rhomboidea Leaf (08/11/2015, Kew Gardens, London)

Callitris rhomboidea Leaf (08/11/2015, Kew Gardens, London)

Callitris rhomboidea, commonly known as Oyster Bay Pine, Port Jackson Pine or Tasmania Cypress Pine, is native to south east Australia. In its native habitat it grows in open woodland.

The etymological root of the binomial name Callitris is derived from the Greek kali meaning ‘beautiful’ and treis meaning ‘three’. Rhomboidea is derived from the Latin rhombi meaning ‘turbot (the fish)’, which is rhombus shaped.

Callitris rhomboidea Fruit (08/11/2015, Kew Gardens, London)

Callitris rhomboidea Fruit (08/11/2015, Kew Gardens, London)

The landscape architect may find Callitris rhomboidea useful as an attractive upright conifer suitable for poor soils.

Ecologically, Callitris rhomboidea is of little value in the UK.

Callitris rhomboidea prefers moist, fertile, well-drained soils. It tolerates most pH of soil. It is tolerant of poor soils.

Callitris rhomboidea requires little maintenance.

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One Response to “Callitris rhomboidea”

  1. I’ve seen some low-growing varieties of this plant growing in low-light conditions. It would be way better to plant it near by block than to re-plant flowers every spring.

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