Search results for 'Hydrangeaceae'

Hydrangea aspera ‘macrophylla’

3 Aug

Hydrangea aspera 'macrophylla' (18/07/2015, Kew Gardens, London)

Hydrangea aspera ‘macrophylla’ (18/07/2015, Kew Gardens, London)

Position: Full sun to light shade

Flowering period: Summer to early autumn

Soil: Moist, well drained

Eventual Height: 2.5m

Eventual Spread: 2.5m

Hardiness: 7a, 7b, 8a, 8b, 9a, 9b

Family: Hydrangeaceae

Hydrangea aspera ‘macrophylla’ is a deciduous shrub with a bushy, lax habit . Its dark green leaves have a hairy upper surface, are lanceolate with entire margins, up to 28cm long and 14cm broad. Its hermaphrodite white to pale pink flowers appear in corymbs which are up to 25cm across.

Hydrangea aspera 'macrophylla' Flower (18/07/2015, Kew Gardens, London)

Hydrangea aspera ‘macrophylla’ Flower (18/07/2015, Kew Gardens, London)

Hydrangea aspera, commonly known as the Rough Leaved Hydrangea, is native to southern China. In its native habitat it grows on mountain slopes in forests and thickets. The variety Hydrangea aspera ‘macrophylla’ is commonly know as Large Leaved Scabrous Hydrangea.

The etymological root of the binomial name Hydrangea is derived from the Greek hydor meaning ‘water’ and aggos meaning ‘jar’ which refers to the plants cusp shaped fruit. Aspera is from the Latin meaning ‘jagged’, in reference to the surface texture of the leaf. Macrophylla is derived from the Latin macro meaning ‘large’ and phyllus meaning ‘leaf’.

Hydrangea aspera 'macrophylla' Leaf (18/07/2015, Kew Gardens, London)

Hydrangea aspera ‘macrophylla’ Leaf (18/07/2015, Kew Gardens, London)

The landscape architect may find Hydrangea aspera ‘macrophylla’ useful for woodland edge plant, and will tolerate the dryer conditions within the root spread of trees.

Ecologically,  Hydrangea aspera ‘macrophylla’ is of little value to UK wildlife.

The Royal Horticultural Society has given Hydrangea aspera ‘macrophylla’ their prestigious Award of Garden Merit in 1993.

Hydrangea aspera ‘macrophylla’ prefers moist, humus rich, well-drained soils. It tolerates most pH of soil.

Hydrangea aspera ‘macrophylla’ requires little maintenance.

DAVIS Landscape Architecture

Landscape Architecture

Schizophragma hydrangeoides

29 Jul

Schizophragma hydrangeoides (18/07/2015, Kew Gardens, London)

Schizophragma hydrangeoides (18/07/2015, Kew Gardens, London)

Position: Full sun to dappled shade

Soil: Moist, well drained

Flowering period: Summer

Eventual Height: 10m

Eventual Spread: 3m

Hardiness: 5a, 5b, 6a, 6b, 7a, 7b, 8a, 8b

Family: Hydrangeaceae

Schizophragma hydrangeoides is a deciduous climbing shrub with a self clinging habit. Its mid green leaves are ovate with slightly toothed margins, up to 16cm long and 8cm broad. Its leaves turn yellow in autumn before they fall. Its stems are woody and produce aerial roots. Its cream/ white flowers domed corymbs and are up to 25cm across.

Schizophragma hydrangeoides Flower (18/07/2015, Kew Gardens, London)

Schizophragma hydrangeoides Flower (18/07/2015, Kew Gardens, London)

Schizophragma hydrangeoides,  commonly known as Japanese Hydrangea Vine, is native to Japan and Korea. In its native habitat it grows in deciduous woodland, climbing tree trunks.

The etymological root of the binomial name Schizophragma is derived from the Greek schiz meaning ‘to split’ and phragma meaning ‘screen’. Hydrangeoides is derived from the Greek menaing ‘like a Hydrangea’.

The landscape architect may find Schizophragma hydrangeoides useful as a self clinging climber suitable for lightly shady areas. A ridged structure should be provided for this plant to grow against. This plant prefers a sheltered location with higher air humidity.

Schizophragma hydrangeoides Leaf (18/07/2015, Kew Gardens, London)

Schizophragma hydrangeoides Leaf (18/07/2015, Kew Gardens, London)

Ecologically,  Schizophragma hydrangeoides flowers will attract pollinating insects, including bees and butterflies.

The Royal Horticultural Society have given a number of varieties of  Schizophragma hydrangeoides their prestigious Award of Garden Merit.

Schizophragma hydrangeoides prefers moist, humus rich, well-drained soils. It tolerates most pH of soil.

Schizophragma hydrangeoides requires little maintenance. Necessary pruning should be carried out in late winter to early spring.

DAVIS Landscape Architecture

Landscape Architecture

Deinanthe bifida

19 Sep

Deinanthe bifida (17/08/2014, Kew Gardens, London)

Deinanthe bifida (17/08/2014, Kew Gardens, London)

Position: Dappled shade to shade

Flowering period: Summer

Soil: Moist, well drained

Eventual Height: 50cm

Eventual Spread: 40cm

Hardiness: 4b, 5a, 5b, 6a, 6b, 7a, 7b, 8a, 8b, 9a

Family: Hydrangeaceae

Deinanthe bifida is a deciduous herbaceous perennial with a clump forming habit. Its mid green leathery leaves are elliptic with serrate margins, a two pointed leaf tip, up to 20cm long and 12cm broad. Its white flowers are bisexual and sterile and appear as terminal corymbs.

Deinanthe bifida Flower (17/08/2014, Kew Gardens, London)

Deinanthe bifida Flower (17/08/2014, Kew Gardens, London)

Deinanthe bifida, commonly known as False Hydrangea or Two Lobed False Hydrangea, is native to Japan. In its native habitat it grows in cool alpine forests.

The etymological root of the binomial name Deinanthe is derived from the Greek deinos meaning ‘extraordinary’ and anthos meaning ‘flower’. Bifida is derived from the Latin meaning ‘split in two’.

The landscape architect may find Deinanthe bifida useful as part of a woodland planting scheme.

Deinanthe bifida Leaf (17/08/2014, Kew Gardens, London)

Deinanthe bifida Leaf (17/08/2014, Kew Gardens, London)

Ecologically, Deinanthe bifida flowers are attractive to some pollinating insects.

Deinanthe bifida prefers moist, fertile, humus rich, well-drained soils. It tolerates most pH of soil. It dislikes dry soils.

Deinanthe bifida requires little maintenance.

Davis Landscape Architecture

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