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Allium senescens

26 Jul

Allium senescens (02/07/2016, Kew Gardens, London)

Allium senescens (02/07/2016, Kew Gardens, London)

Position: Full sun to light shade

Soil: Moist, well drained

Flowering period: Summer

Eventual Height: 50cm

Eventual Spread:  20cm

Hardiness: 4b, 5a, 5b, 6a, 6b, 7a, 7b, 8a, 8b, 9a

Family: Amaryllidaceae

Sub Family: Alliaceae

Allium senescens is a deciduous/ semi evergreen bulbous perennial with a clump forming habit. Its dark green are linear, hollow, up to 30cm long and 12mm broad. Its pink/ purple hermaphrodite flowers are terminal umbels of bell-shaped flowers, these emerge from a papery bract in summer.

Allium senescens Emerging Flowers (02/07/2016, Kew Gardens, London)

Allium senescens Emerging Flowers (02/07/2016, Kew Gardens, London)

Allium senescens, commonly known as German Garlic, Mountain Garlic or Broadleaf Chives, is native to central Europe to Siberia, China and Korea. In its native habitat it grows in dry rocky places.

The etymological root of the binomial name Allium was the ancient Latin term for garlic. Senescens is derived from the Latin senesco meaning ‘grow old’.

Allium senescens Leaf (02/07/2016, Kew Gardens, London)

Allium senescens Leaf (02/07/2016, Kew Gardens, London)

The landscape architect may find Allium senescens useful as part of mixed perennial planting scheme. Once established this perennial is drought tolerant.

Ecologically, Allium senescens flowers are attractive to pollinating insects, including bees and butterflies.

Allium senescens prefers moist, rich, fertile, well-drained soils. It tolerates most pH of soil.

Allium senescens requires little maintenance. Clumps of this plant may be divided in spring or autumn.

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Landscape Architecture

Lilium regale

15 Jul

Lilium regale (02/07/2016, Kew Gardens, London)

Lilium regale (02/07/2016, Kew Gardens, London)

Position: Full sun

Flowering period: Summer

Soil: Moist, well drained

Eventual Height: 1.2m

Eventual Spread: 35cm

Hardiness: 4b, 5a, 5b, 6a, 6b, 7a, 7b, 8a, 8b, 9a

Family: Liliaceae

Lilium regale is a deciduous bulbous perennial with an erect habit. Its mid green leaves are lanceolate with entire margins, up to 8cm long and 3mm across. Its fragrant white flowers are trumpet shaped, yellow at their centres with pink/ purple on their outsides, up to 14cm long and appear as terminal racemes. The roots of this plant appear from a bulb which can achieve a size of up to 35mm across.

Lilium regale Flower (02/07/2016, Kew Gardens, London)

Lilium regale Flower (02/07/2016, Kew Gardens, London)

Lilium regale, commonly known as King’s Lily or Regal Lily, is native to south west China. In its native habitat it grows on rocky slopes and river banks. It should be noted this plant is toxic to cats.

The etymological root of the binomial name Lilium is derived from the Greek leirion the name given to the Madonna Lily (Lilium candidum). Regale is from the Latin regalis meaning ‘regal’.

The landscape architect may find Lilium regale useful as a fragrant bulbous perennial for introducing into a mixed herbaceous perennial.

Lilium regale Leaf (02/07/2016, Kew Gardens, London)

Lilium regale Leaf (02/07/2016, Kew Gardens, London)

Ecologically,  Lilium regale flowers are attractive to pollinating insects.

The Royal Horticultural Society have given Lilium regale their prestigious Award of Garden Merit in 1993.

Lilium regale prefers moist, humus rich, well-drained soils. It tolerates most pH of soil, although it prefers an neutral to acid pH.

Lilium regale requires little maintenance. The scarlet Lily Beetle may attack this plant. The stems of this plant may require staking to support its relatively large blooms.

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Landscape Architecture

Cypripedium formosanum

23 May

Cypripedium formosanum (23/04/2016, Kew Gardens, London)

Cypripedium formosanum (23/04/2016, Kew Gardens, London)

Position: Part shade to shade

Flowering period: Spring

Soil: Moist, well drained

Eventual Height: 25cm

Eventual Spread: 30cm

Hardiness: 8a, 8b, 9a, 9b

Family: Orchidaceae

Subfamily: Cypripedioideae

Cypripedium formosanum is a deciduous bulbous orchid with a spreading habit. Its mid green leaves are flabellate, pleated with entire margins, up to 13cm long and 11cm across. Its white flowers have pink spots, are pendulous, appear terminally and up to 5cm long. Its roots contain stoloniferous rhizomes which aids its slow spread.

Cypripedium formosanum Flower (23/04/2016, Kew Gardens, London)

Cypripedium formosanum Flower (23/04/2016, Kew Gardens, London)

Cypripedium formosanum, commonly known as Formosan Lady’s Slippers or Beautiful Cypripedium, is native to Taiwan. In its native habitat it grows in mountain forests and bogs. Cypripedium formosanum is classified as Endangered according to The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species.

The etymological root of the binomial name Cypripedium is derived from the Greek Kypris, a name for Aphrodite and podilon meaning ‘slipper’.  Formosanum is derived from the former name of Taiwan, Formosa.

The landscape architect may find Cypripedium formosanum useful as a low growing perennial bulb with attractive flowers and leaves.

Cypripedium formosanum Leaf (23/04/2016, Kew Gardens, London)

Cypripedium formosanum Leaf (23/04/2016, Kew Gardens, London)

Ecologically,  Cypripedium formosanum flowers are attractive to pollinating insects.

The Royal Horticultural Society have given  Cypripedium formosanum their prestigious Award of Garden Merit in 2012.

Cypripedium formosanum prefers moist, humus rich, fertile, well-drained soils. It tolerates most pH of soil.

Cypripedium formosanum requires little maintenance. Large clumps may be divided during its dormant period.

DAVIS Landscape Architecture

Landscape Architecture

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