Acer rufinerve

4 Aug

Acer rufinerve (18/07/2015, Kew Gardens, London)

Acer rufinerve (18/07/2015, Kew Gardens, London)

Position: Full sun to light shade

Flowering period: Late spring

Soil: Moist, well drained

Eventual Height: 12m

Eventual Spread: 9m

Hardiness: 6b, 7a, 7b, 8a, 8b, 9a

Family: Sapindaceae

Acer rufinerve is a deciduous tree with a rounded habit. Its dark green leaves are broadly ovate with serrulate margins, three lobed, up to 16cm long and 16cm broad. Its leaves turn orange to red in autumn before they fall. Its trunk may achieve a diameter of 40cm. Its light grey and olive green striped bark is smooth. Its yellow flowers are small, produced in racemes and up to 10cm long. Its green fruit is a samara which is up to 3cm long.

Acer rufinerve, commonly known as the Redvein Maple, Snake Bark Maple or Grey Snake Bark Maple, is native to Japan. In its native habitat it grows in mountain forests. There is currently discussion that this tree may be invasive in parts of Northern Europe.

Acer rufinerve Leaf (18/07/2015, Kew Gardens, London)

Acer rufinerve Leaf (18/07/2015, Kew Gardens, London)

The etymology of the binomial name Acer is derived from the classical Latin name for the Maple. Rufinerve is derived from the Latin rufus menaing ‘red’ and nervus meaning ‘veined’.

The landscape architect may find Acer rufinerve useful as a small tree with attractive bark and autumn leaf colour.

Ecologically, Acer rufinerve is attractive to pollinating insects.

Acer rufinerve prefers moist, fertile, well-drained soils. It tolerates most pH of soil.

Acer rufinerve requires little maintenance. Pruning should be carried out during the dormant months.

DAVIS Landscape Architecture

Landscape Architecture

Hydrangea aspera ‘macrophylla’

3 Aug

Hydrangea aspera 'macrophylla' (18/07/2015, Kew Gardens, London)

Hydrangea aspera ‘macrophylla’ (18/07/2015, Kew Gardens, London)

Position: Full sun to light shade

Flowering period: Summer to early autumn

Soil: Moist, well drained

Eventual Height: 2.5m

Eventual Spread: 2.5m

Hardiness: 7a, 7b, 8a, 8b, 9a, 9b

Family: Hydrangeaceae

Hydrangea aspera ‘macrophylla’ is a deciduous shrub with a bushy, lax habit . Its dark green leaves have a hairy upper surface, are lanceolate with entire margins, up to 28cm long and 14cm broad. Its hermaphrodite white to pale pink flowers appear in corymbs which are up to 25cm across.

Hydrangea aspera 'macrophylla' Flower (18/07/2015, Kew Gardens, London)

Hydrangea aspera ‘macrophylla’ Flower (18/07/2015, Kew Gardens, London)

Hydrangea aspera, commonly known as the Rough Leaved Hydrangea, is native to southern China. In its native habitat it grows on mountain slopes in forests and thickets. The variety Hydrangea aspera ‘macrophylla’ is commonly know as Large Leaved Scabrous Hydrangea.

The etymological root of the binomial name Hydrangea is derived from the Greek hydor meaning ‘water’ and aggos meaning ‘jar’ which refers to the plants cusp shaped fruit. Aspera is from the Latin meaning ‘jagged’, in reference to the surface texture of the leaf. Macrophylla is derived from the Latin macro meaning ‘large’ and phyllus meaning ‘leaf’.

Hydrangea aspera 'macrophylla' Leaf (18/07/2015, Kew Gardens, London)

Hydrangea aspera ‘macrophylla’ Leaf (18/07/2015, Kew Gardens, London)

The landscape architect may find Hydrangea aspera ‘macrophylla’ useful for woodland edge plant, and will tolerate the dryer conditions within the root spread of trees.

Ecologically,  Hydrangea aspera ‘macrophylla’ is of little value to UK wildlife.

The Royal Horticultural Society has given Hydrangea aspera ‘macrophylla’ their prestigious Award of Garden Merit in 1993.

Hydrangea aspera ‘macrophylla’ prefers moist, humus rich, well-drained soils. It tolerates most pH of soil.

Hydrangea aspera ‘macrophylla’ requires little maintenance.

DAVIS Landscape Architecture

Landscape Architecture

Ugni molinae

31 Jul

Ugni molinae (18/07/2015, Kew Gardens, London)

Ugni molinae (18/07/2015, Kew Gardens, London)

Position: Full sun to light shade

Flowering period: Summer

Soil: Moist, well drained

Eventual Height: 1.5m

Eventual Spread: 1m

Hardiness: 7b, 8a, 8b, 9a, 9b, 10a

Family: Myrtaceae

Ugni molinae is an evergreen shrub with a bushy habit. Its dark green glossy leaves are ovate with entire margins, up to 2cm long and 15mm across. Its white/ pale pink pendulous flowers are up to 1cm across. Its red/ purple fruit is a berry and up to 1cm across, these are commonly known as Ungni Berry or New Zealand Cranberry.

Ugni molinae Flower (18/07/2015, Kew Gardens, London)

Ugni molinae Flower (18/07/2015, Kew Gardens, London)

Ugni molinae, commonly known as Chilean Guava or Strawberry Myrtle, is native to Chile and south Argentina. In its native habitat it grows in the temperate rain forests of Chile and Argentina at woodland edges.

The etymological root of the binomial name Ugni is derived from the vanacular Chilean name for this plant. Molinae is named after Juan I Molina (1740 – 1829).

The landscape architect may find Ugni molinae useful as an evergreen shrub with attractive flowers and edible fruit. This is a suitable shrub for growing in a community type garden. It may also be grown as an evergreen hedging species. Once established this shrub is drought tollerant.

Ugni molinae Leaf (18/07/2015, Kew Gardens, London)

Ugni molinae Leaf (18/07/2015, Kew Gardens, London)

Ecologically, Ugni molinae flowers are attractive to pollinating insects, including bees. Its berries are attractive to birds and mammals (including humans).

Ugni molinae prefers moist, fertile, well-drained soils. It tolerates most pH of soil.

Ugni molinae requires little maintenance. Pruning may be carried out any time of year, however this may be at the expense of the flowers and fruit.

DAVIS Landscape Architecture

Landscape Architecture

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