Picea koraiensis

30 Mar

Picea koraiensis (01/03/2015, Kew Gardens, London)

Picea koraiensis (01/03/2015, Kew Gardens, London)

Position: Full sun to partial shade

Flowering period: Late spring

Soil: Moist, well drained

Eventual Height: 30m

Eventual Spread: 12m

Hardiness: 5a, 5b, 6a, 6b, 7a, 7b, 8a, 8b

Family: Pinaceae

Picea koraiensis is a large coniferous evergreen tree with a conical habit. Its grey/ green leaves are needle like, up to 22mm long and 1.8mm across. Its trunk may achieve a diameter of up to 80cm. Its grey to red/ brown bark is flaking. Its male flowers are in the form of pollen cones. Its female fruit are ovoid to cylindrical cones, maturing to pale brown, up to 8cm long and 3.5cm across.

Picea koraiensis Leaf (01/03/2015, Kew Gardens, London)

Picea koraiensis Leaf (01/03/2015, Kew Gardens, London)

Picea koraiensis, commonly known as Korean Spruce, is native to north Korea, north east China and south east Russia. In its native habitat it grows in coniferous woodland on mountain slopes in coniferous forests at an altitude of 400m to 1800m.

The etymological root of the binomial name Picea is derived from the Latin Pix meaning ‘pitch or tar’ in reference to the Spruce trees resin. Koraiensis is derived form the Latin meaning ‘from Korea’.

Picea koraiensis Bark (01/03/2015, Kew Gardens, London)

Picea koraiensis Bark (01/03/2015, Kew Gardens, London)

When available the landscape architect may find Picea koraiensis useful as an attractive coniferous specimen tree.

Ecologically, Picea koraiensis seeds are attractive to some birds.

Picea koraiensis prefers  moist, humus rich, well-drained soils. It tolerates most pH of soil.

Picea koraiensis requires little maintenance.

Picea brachytyla

27 Mar

Picea brachytyla (01/03/2015, Kew Gardens, London)

Picea brachytyla (01/03/2015, Kew Gardens, London)

Position: Full sun to partial shade

Flowering period: Spring

Soil: Moist, well drained

Eventual Height: 40m

Eventual Spread: 15m

Hardiness: 8a, 8b, 9a, 9b, 10a

Family: Pinaceae

Picea brachytyla is a large coniferous evergreen tree with a cylindrical to irregular habit as it matures. Its dark green leaves are needle like, flattened, up to 2.5cm long and 1.5mm broad. Its trunk may achieve a diameter of up to 1m. Its grey/ brown bark is fissured with square plates and flaking. Its male flowers are in the form of pollen cones. Its female fruit are ovoid/ oblong pendulous cones, initially green, maturing to dull brown, up to 10cm long and 4cm across.

Picea brachytyla Leaf (01/03/2015, Kew Gardens, London)

Picea brachytyla Leaf (01/03/2015, Kew Gardens, London)

Picea brachytyla, commonly known as Sargent Spruce, is native to south west China. In its native habitat it grows in evergreen woodland on moist mountain slopes in coniferous forests at an altitude of 1300m to 3800m. This tree is listed as Vulnerable according to the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species.

The etymological root of the binomial name Picea is derived from the Latin Pix meaning ‘pitch or tar’ in reference to the Spruce trees resin. Brachytyla is derived from the Greek braxus meaning ‘short’ and tylos meaning ‘swelling’.

Picea brachytyla Bark (01/03/2015, Kew Gardens, London)

Picea brachytyla Bark (01/03/2015, Kew Gardens, London)

When available the landscape architect may find Picea brachytyla useful as an upright evergreen coniferous specimen tree suitable for wet climates. It will not tolerate atmospheric pollution.

Ecologically, Picea brachytyla seeds are attractive to some birds.

Picea brachytyla prefers  moist, humus rich, well-drained soils. It prefers an acid to neutral pH of soil. It dislikes dry soils.

Picea brachytyla requires little maintenance.

Cupressus bakeri

26 Mar

Cupressus bakeri (01/03/2015, Kew Gardens, London)

Cupressus bakeri (01/03/2015, Kew Gardens, London)

Position: Full sun

Flowering period: Spring

Soil: Moist, well drained

Eventual Height: 30m

Eventual Spread: 10m

Hardiness: 6a, 6b, 7a, 7b, 8a, 8b, 9a, 9b, 10a

Family: Cupressaceae

Cupressus bakeri is a slow growing, long lived, evergreen conifer with a conical habit. Its dull grey/ green leaves are scale like, fragrant when crushed, up to 5mm long and produced on rounded shoots. Its trunk may achieve a diameter of up to 50cm. Its grey/ red/ brown bark is fibrous, thick and peels off in longitudinal strips. Its monoecious flowers appear as cones, the male being globular and up to 5mm long and the female globose to oblong, up to 25mm long, are green/ brown when young and maturing to grey to  grey/ brown.

Cupressus bakeri Leaf (01/03/2015, Kew Gardens, London)

Cupressus bakeri Leaf (01/03/2015, Kew Gardens, London)

Cupressus bakeri, commonly known as Baker Cypress, Modoc Cypress, or Siskiyou Cypress, is native to south west Oregon and north California, USA. In its native habitat it grows in small scattered populations in mixed evergreen forests at an altitude of between 900 and 2000m. This tree is classified as Vulnerable according to The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species.

The etymological root of the binomial name Cupressus is derived from the old Latin name for ‘Italian cypress’. Bakeri is named after Charles Henry Baker (1848-?), a botanist from USA.

When available landscape architect may find Cupressus bakeri useful as a slow growing evergreen tree suitable for climates with low humidity and mineral soils. Once established this tree is drought tollerant.

Cupressus bakeri Bark (01/03/2015, Kew Gardens, London)

Cupressus bakeri Bark (01/03/2015, Kew Gardens, London)

Ecologically,  Cupressus bakeri may provide cover for birds.

Cupressus bakeri prefers moist, well-drained mineral soils. It tolerates most pH of soil, although it prefers a slightly acid soil.

Cupressus bakeri requires little maintenance.

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