Pier 46, Hudson River Park, New York

27 May

Hudson River Park 'Pier 46', New York, USA - Side View of Pier

Hudson River Park ‘Pier 46′, New York, USA – Side View of Pier

Located on the west shore of Manhattan, from Hells Kitchen, past Chelsea and Greenwich Village to Tribeca, is Hudson River Park. This is a linear park following the shore side of West Street. This is an ongoing project of pier rebuilding and public realm improvements to the shore line. Public funding for the project commenced in 1999 and continues to this day.

Hudson River Park, New York, USA - Map

Hudson River Park, New York, USA – Map

Pier 46 is one of the completed Hudson River Park projects. This pier by its nature form a linear park which juts out into the Hudson River, providing a cooling breeze on a hot summers day. This park performs the function of a programmable space with summer cinema screenings, yoga classes and educational events.

Hudson River Park 'Pier 46', New York, USA - Pier 46 Entrance

Hudson River Park ‘Pier 46′, New York, USA – Pier 46 Entrance

Hudson River Park 'Pier 46', New York, USA - Disabled Access to the Lawn

Hudson River Park ‘Pier 46′, New York, USA – Disabled Access to the Lawn

At each end of the pier a grove of trees has been planted, under which bench seating has been placed. The groves are planted at a slightly raised level so as to allow for a suitable depth of topsoil to enable these trees to thrive.

Hudson River Park 'Pier 46', New York, USA -  Tree Providing Shading for  Seating

Hudson River Park ‘Pier 46′, New York, USA – Tree Providing Shading for Seating

Hudson River Park 'Pier 46', New York, USA - Stand of Trees at the End of Pier

Hudson River Park ‘Pier 46′, New York, USA – Stand of Trees at the End of Pier

On the day I visited the Pier 46 several groups of friends were chatting at the tables and fishing in the deep water off the end of the pier. The piles in the water off the end of Pier 46 were retained as a valuable habitat for fish.

Hudson River Park 'Pier 46', New York, USA - Fishing at the End of the Pier

Hudson River Park ‘Pier 46′, New York, USA – Fishing at the End of the Pier

To each long edge of the pier a raise promenade is located. Three planters at promenade level are space evenly along the south promenade. Between the two promenades a sunken synthetic grass lawn space has been created. As the lawn is synthetic little maintenance is required and build up to it foundation can be kept t a minimum.

Hudson River Park 'Pier 46', New York, USA - Barrier to the Edge of the Pier

Hudson River Park ‘Pier 46′, New York, USA – Barrier to the Edge of the Pier

Hudson River Park 'Pier 46', New York, USA - Tree Planting to the Edge of the Lawn

Hudson River Park ‘Pier 46′, New York, USA – Tree Planting to the Edge of the Lawn

Hudson River Park 'Pier 46', New York, USA - Synthetic Grass Lawn and Edging

Hudson River Park ‘Pier 46′, New York, USA – Synthetic Grass Lawn and Edging

 

Davis Landscape Architecture

 

Prunus speciosa

26 May

Prunus speciosa (04/04/2015, Kyoto Botanic Gardens, Kyoto)

Prunus speciosa (04/04/2015, Kyoto Botanic Gardens, Kyoto)

Position: Full sun

Flowering period: Spring

Soil: Moist, well drained

Eventual Height: 12m

Eventual Spread: 12m

Hardiness: 7a, 7b, 8a, 8b, 9a, 9b

Family:Rosaceae

Prunus speciosa Flower (04/04/2015, Kyoto Botanic Gardens, Kyoto)

Prunus speciosa Flower (04/04/2015, Kyoto Botanic Gardens, Kyoto)

Prunus speciosa is a deciduous tree with a spreading habit. Its dark green leaves are elliptic with serrate margins, up to 10cm long and 6m broad. Its leaves turn yellow/ orange before they fall in autumn. Its white fragrant flowers are up to 4cm across and appear just before or at the same time as the leaves in clusters of up to 6. Its black fruit, the cherry, is a small globose drupe which is up to 1cm across.

Prunus speciosa, commonly known as Oshima Cherry, is native to south east Japan. This tree is one of the parents of the hybrid Prunus x yedoensis.

Prunus speciosa Leaf (04/04/2015, Kyoto Botanic Gardens, Kyoto)

Prunus speciosa Leaf (04/04/2015, Kyoto Botanic Gardens, Kyoto)

The etymological root of the binomial name Prunus is from the classical name of the Plum tree. Speciosa is from the Latin meaning ‘spectacular’.

The landscape architect may find Prunus speciosa useful as an attractive spring flowering small tree.

Ecologically, Prunus speciosa flowers are attractive to pollinating insects. Its fruit are attractive to birds and mammals.

Prunus speciosa Bark (04/04/2015, Kyoto Botanic Gardens, Kyoto)

Prunus speciosa Bark (04/04/2015, Kyoto Botanic Gardens, Kyoto)

Prunus speciosa prefers moist, fertile, deep, well-drained soils. It tolerates most pH of soil. This tree dislikes dry soils.

Prunus speciosa requires little maintenance. Pruning should be carried out after flowering, from April to July to minimise the risk of Silver leaf infection.

Phyllostachys dulcis

25 May

Phyllostachys dulcis (04/04/2015, Kyoto Botanic Gardens, London)

Phyllostachys dulcis (04/04/2015, Kyoto Botanic Gardens, London)

Position: Full sun to partial shade

Flowering period: N/A

Soil: Moist, well drained

Eventual Height: 12m

Eventual Spread: 4m

Hardiness: 7a, 7b, 8a, 8b, 9a, 9b, 10a, 10b

Family: Poaceae

Phyllostachys dulcis is a large, evergreen, running bamboo. Its mid green leaves are linear with entire margins, up to 10cm long, 1.5m broad and slightly pendulous. Its grey/ green canes are smooth with a white ring at the node, and may achieve a diameter of up to 6cm. Its roots produce underground rhizomes which enables it spread.

Phyllostachys dulcis Stems (04/04/2015, Kyoto Botanic Gardens, London)

Phyllostachys dulcis Stems (04/04/2015, Kyoto Botanic Gardens, London)

Phyllostachys dulcis, commonly known as Sweetshoot Bamboo, is native to China. The shoots of this bamboo are sweet and may be eaten.

The etymological root of the binomial name Phyllostachys is derived from the Greek phyllon ‘leaf’ and stachys ‘spike’. Dulcis is from the Latin meaning ‘sweet’.

The landscape architect may find Phyllostachys dulcis useful as a large evergreen bamboo with attractive stems.

Ecologically, Phyllostachys dulcis is of little wildlife value in the UK.

Phyllostachys dulcis Leaf (04/04/2015, Kyoto Botanic Gardens, London)

Phyllostachys dulcis Leaf (04/04/2015, Kyoto Botanic Gardens, London)

Phyllostachys dulcis prefers moist, humus rich, well-drained soils. It tolerates most pH of soil. It dislikes dry soils.

Phyllostachys dulcis requires little maintenance. This bamboo may be contained by root pruning or a root barrier.

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